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This room is for discussion on entertainment, movies, television, jokes or light-hearted topics. Please keep discussion clean and appropriate for a Catholic site.

Saint Vitus is the patron saint of actors, comedians, dancers, and of entertainers in general.
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Feb 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Do any Austen fans/dance lovers know what the difference was between British (native?) and American dance...
(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Do any Austen fans/dance lovers know what the difference was between British (native?) and American dance at the time?

Another dance quote - "To be fond of dance was a certain step towards falling in love."
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Let me knoe what book is that quote from and I could probably help decifer what she was referring to?

Feb 23rd 2013 new

I love Jane Austen. I wish my daughter Bree was here, she is a serious fan and would have plenty of quotes to share :-). . . I have heard that they are supposed to be making Northanger Abbey into a new movie, I know its been done a couple of times but it is one I've never seen. . .

Feb 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) Lauren-927923 said: I love Jane Austen. I wish my daughter Bree was here, she is a serious fan and would have plenty...
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said:

I love Jane Austen. I wish my daughter Bree was here, she is a serious fan and would have plenty of quotes to share :-). . . I have heard that they are supposed to be making Northanger Abbey into a new movie, I know its been done a couple of times but it is one I've never seen. . .

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North Hanger Abbey is my least favorite of Jane's works. (It may just be me although I like it don't get me wrong). I think that it has a gothic aspect to it that I can not relate to and also the heroine Catherine lacks the cleverness and wit that Jane is usually able to develop. I think that is possibly due to the fact that it was her first published work and like many new authors starting out they have to play to the popular media. Once she became more popular it obvious that she was afforded more freedom and was able to do character development as only Jane knew how. When you look at the popular published works from female authors from around that time, namely the Bronte sisters, the evidence of the pressure to cater to the gothic fantasy of romance is extremely evident. Of course I still like it as I am a Jane die-hard ( not even kidding) but it definitely is a unique work from Jane.

Feb 23rd 2013 new
(Quote) Shara-929649 said: Let me knoe what book is that quote from and I could probably help decifer what she was referri...
(Quote) Shara-929649 said:



Let me knoe what book is that quote from and I could probably help decifer what she was referring to?

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Thanks, Elizabeth and Shara.

I went back to reference the quote. I (erroneously) thought it was a minor character responding to a preceding quote by Darcy that he was a hopeless dancer...followed by him making a sarcastic comment about dancing. I interpreted it to be a minor character quipping back to him that he needed a simple traditional girl (i.e. Elizabeth) to teach him to dance...like the natives...which I presumed meant "proper" for turn-of-the-century England.

Learned something. That quote came from a romantic musical film adaptation of P & P, entitled Bride & Prejudice....so, who knows what the quote meant.
Feb 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Thanks, Elizabeth and Shara. I went back to reference the quote. I (erroneously) thought it was a...
(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Thanks, Elizabeth and Shara.

I went back to reference the quote. I (erroneously) thought it was a minor character responding to a preceding quote by Darcy that he was a hopeless dancer...followed by him making a sarcastic comment about dancing. I interpreted it to be a minor character quipping back to him that he needed a simple traditional girl (i.e. Elizabeth) to teach him to dance...like the natives...which I presumed meant "proper" for turn-of-the-century England.

Learned something. That quote came from a romantic musical film adaptation of P & P, entitled Bride & Prejudice....so, who knows what the quote meant.
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That makes sense. I did not ever recall a line like that from Jane but you never recall every line from every book so I was curious.

Feb 23rd 2013 new
(Quote) Shara-929649 said: That makes sense. I did not ever recall a line like that from Jane but you never recall every l...
(Quote) Shara-929649 said:



That makes sense. I did not ever recall a line like that from Jane but you never recall every line from every book so I was curious.

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The dance quote wasn't familiar to me either, but since I'm no expert on Austen, I thought it was something I had forgotten.
Feb 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) Shara-929649 said: The best thing about that romance is the classic difference in which men and women view ...
(Quote) Shara-929649 said:

The best thing about that romance is the classic difference in which men and women view and interpret romantic action.

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So true! I love that when she and Benwick argue whether men or women are more fickle in love but he finally concedes and agrees with Anne that women love the longest even when all hope is gone. weeping

BTW, Shara, you should check out Mr. Darcy's Diary which gives Darcy's version of events. I know there is some weird Austen sequels out there (i.e. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies LOL) but this one is actually good.

Feb 27th 2013 new

As a satire of the gothic genre Northanger Abbey pokes fun at some of the gothic conventions of her day so I think we miss some of the 'in' jokes by reading Northanger Abbey without having read comtemporary works that would have been like the Mysteries of Udulpho....Also it was one of her earlier works so it being satire and an early work is probably why it reads differently than the others...While N A is fun P& P and Mansfield Park are my favorites.

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