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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

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Feb 18th 2013 new

I agree, if more people understood that confession is not about admitting our sins, but receiving the beautiful gift of grace and forgiveness, I believe people would run to the confessionals. Now a days, priest don't spend a lot of time in the confessional because they end up being there and only hearing one or two confessions. Not that that one or two confessions were worth it, but if people were more excited about receiving the sacrament then the need for a longer confessional appointment would be needed.

Feb 18th 2013 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious ra...
(Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious rather than diocesan priests. Also, priests of Opus Dei hear confessions for hours on end. We must be gentle on our poor parish priests. They get attacked from all sides. They get dumped on. The get complained about. The bishops get anonymous letters about them. It's a wonder they all don't quit in disgust or get roaring drunk every night. Every minute of their time belongs to someone else and more often than not, that person is ungrateful. Look around and you'll find priests in your diocese who hear confessions all the time.
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Glad you stated that David. Being a parish priest is one tough job.Their duties are endless and their time is not their own.


-I have a monastery about 35 minutes from me where they have confession every day...from approx 10-12 3-6 8-10. I frequent this

monastery even though its a bit of a drive. And the priests have more time and different type duties than the parish priests.

Feb 18th 2013 new

(Quote) Roberta-930804 said: I agree, if more people understood that confession is not about admitting our sins, but receivi...
(Quote) Roberta-930804 said:

I agree, if more people understood that confession is not about admitting our sins, but receiving the beautiful gift of grace and forgiveness, I believe people would run to the confessionals. Now a days, priest don't spend a lot of time in the confessional because they end up being there and only hearing one or two confessions. Not that that one or two confessions were worth it, but if people were more excited about receiving the sacrament then the need for a longer confessional appointment would be needed.

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Confession is very much in our admitting our sins. Only when we face up to and admit our sins can the fruits of the Sacrament work in our lives.

Part of the reason for moving to call it reconciliation was a silly attempt to emphasis that fact.

If we don't understand and face our sins, redemption is not possible. You cannot reform yourself unless you know that you have faults.

Feb 19th 2013 new

Just to clarify: The Precepts of the Church (emphasis mine):

To assist at Mass on all Sundays and holy days of obligation.

To fast and to abstain on the days appointed.

To confess our sins at least once a year.

To receive Holy Communion during the Easter time.

To contribute to the support of the Church.

To observe the laws of the Church concerning marriage.

We are only obligated to receive Communion once a year, but we must attend Mass each Sunday. THAT is the bare minimum.

Feb 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Thomas-699657 said: How is that the bare minimum??? If you don't go to Mass on Sunday it's a mortal sin as f...
(Quote) Thomas-699657 said:

How is that the bare minimum??? If you don't go to Mass on Sunday it's a mortal sin as far as I have learn from the faith are have known all my life. What makes me wonder is how so many Catholics don't know this. Who went to the same Catholic school I went to or went to religious instuctions.t It's like they don't teach this anymore.

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Thomas, you're right. And, it does seem sometimes that these things aren't being taught. Part of it is that these things don't sink in for some people until years later, no matter how many times they are taught. There is also the tug with secular activities, that although they shouldn't they do tend to dominate people's lives. And, please note I am not condoning this, but I do understand how parents, especially those whose dominant social group are not of the same religious persuasion, are torn. I am glad that my children are now grown, but we had many many battles about this, and sometimes my children faced a penalty at school because we insisted they attend Mass or another religious function, etc. We were just having this discussion at a social gathering, how the sports programs, etc make insane demands of parents and penalize the children if their parents take them on vacation or insist they attend another function etc.

From the Precepts: (The minimum obligations)

Attend Sunday Mass weekly and the Holy Days of obligation and rest from servile labor.

Go to Confession at least once a year.

Receive Holy Communion at least during the Easter season

Observe days of fast and abstinence as established by the Church

Help provide for the needs of the Church

The catechism lists the above five, the Canon Law website lists and comments on these five and adds a sixth - Obey the laws regarding Marriage, and often a seventh is also included - participate in the mission of the Church.

One of the hardest things to get across to teens we worked with sometimes was that they were required to attend mass weekly -- not necessarily go to Communion, that they had to do at least once a year. That and that just because they were on vacation or out of town or doing something else that they still needed to fulfill their obligation to attend Mass.

When we were kids, Mass came first, so no matter what we had done the night before we had to attend Mass Sunday morning, no ifs ands or buts. Or we had to make certain we attended Mass first before we went out. I reminded them that was one of the beauties of our Faith, they can attend Mass anywhere, home parish or away. There is almost always a mass within driving distance they can attend. We live twenty minutes from our big university town and the parish associated with the University hosts a Sunday late afternoon, early evening Mass, specifically for students who might have been returning to campus earlier.

I was blessed in many respects to have grown up in a small, tight knit neighborhood centered around our parish and parochial school. So the rules were the same for all of us and we kept each other in line most of the time.

Feb 19th 2013 new

The Sacrament of Reconciliation is one of my favorite sacraments. I think it is such a beautiful gift. And, yes, it can be hard to examine our consciences, humble ourselves and admit our failings to ourselves, another human being and God. But, wow, what a beautiful expression of love it is and an acknowledgement of the frailty of the human condition, but not a hopeless condition.

It does make me sad when people are angry or horrified about confession, because they so miss the beauty of it and the gift of it. I find it comforting that in His Wisdom, God knows we will fail, but because He loves us, He provides us with a Sacrament that makes us face that reality and through which we can gain strength and enlightenment to improve and try again.

Feb 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Jessica-897416 said: I also don't get who some priests change the words to the absolution prayer.
(Quote) Jessica-897416 said:

I also don't get who some priests change the words to the absolution prayer.

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I know that sometimes I had wondered if I the priest had said it correctly when I went to confession. Maybe someone can clarify if there is more than one absolution prayer. I thought that there was only supposed to be one, but not sure.

Feb 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Jessica-897416 said: I am not sure about anyone else but I really wish that we could be blessed with priests today l...
(Quote) Jessica-897416 said:

I am not sure about anyone else but I really wish that we could be blessed with priests today like Padre Pio or St. John Vianney who stay in the confessional for hours at end to hear confessions and not a mere 30 minutes to an hour once a week before Saturday evening mass and priests that can read souls. I also don't get who some priests change the words to the absolution prayer. Comments...

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Hi Jessica,

Part of the problem I think is our priests are spread pretty thin these days, but I know what you mean. We are blessed here in the Sacramento area to have a Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter - a Traditional Latin Mass community (in full union with Rome) - where confessions are offered a half hour before every Mass - all the daily Masses, which means usually two Masses a day - all the weekend Masses and are available by appointment as well. Do you have a spiritual director you can see on a regular basis who could hear your confessions as well as give you spiritual direction? That might be a good solution.

Feb 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Tom-112790 said: (Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confe...
(Quote) Tom-112790 said:

Quote:
David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious rather than diocesan priests. Also, priests of Opus Dei hear confessions for hours on end. We must be gentle on our poor parish priests. They get attacked from all sides. They get dumped on. The get complained about. The bishops get anonymous letters about them. It's a wonder they all don't quit in disgust or get roaring drunk every night. Every minute of their time belongs to someone else and more often than not, that person is ungrateful. Look around and you'll find priests in your diocese who hear confessions all the time.



Glad you stated that David. Being a parish priest is one tough job.Their duties are endless and their time is not their own.


-I have a monastery about 35 minutes from me where they have confession every day...from approx 10-12 3-6 8-10. I frequent this

monastery even though its a bit of a drive. And the priests have more time and different type duties than the parish priests.

--hide--

Tom - I'm very curious - which monastery is this? I live in the Sacramento area and am wondering - is this the Carmelite Monastery in Oakville that you are referring to, or another?

Feb 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Joseph-903200 said: I'm not sure if there is enough demand for confession to support a priest spending hours in ...
(Quote) Joseph-903200 said:

I'm not sure if there is enough demand for confession to support a priest spending hours in a confessional. This would take them from other duties and many are overworked as it is.

The idea of sin and being sinner is not in vogue these days if it was there would be more demand for confession.

Sometimes when I go to confession I'm not always asked to say an Act of Contrition. And sometimes my penance at one parish is to just sit in the church for a while and reflect.

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Joseph are you near any of these FSSP houses? FSSP priests tend to offer very good confessional assistance I've found.

St. Peter's House (diocese: Scranton)
119 Griffin Rd.
Elmhurst Township PA 18444
Tel. +1 570 842 4000

Website: http://www.fssp.com

St. Michael's House (diocese: Scranton)
1703 Jackson Street
Scranton PA 18504
Tel. +1 570 961 1205

St. Anthony of Padua House (diocese: Youngstown)
291 Scoville Drive
Vienna OH 44473
Tel. +1 330 856 4204

St. John Mary Vianney House (diocese: Cincinnati)
140 S. Findlay St.
Dayton OH 45403
Tel. +1 937 938 6098

Website: http://www.daytonlatinmass.org

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