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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Feb 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Thomas-699657 said: Loretta thanks for your reply I thought you were getting on me for my wondering. I'm not try...
(Quote) Thomas-699657 said:

Loretta thanks for your reply I thought you were getting on me for my wondering. I'm not trying to judge the priest, I'm just concerned at how many Catholics don't know when they commit a moral sin. They don't go to confession and receive the Eucharist and think it's ok. I worry for them and if they don't understand why and don't think I'm telling them the truth. How will there eyes be opened to the truth??? If the priest never talks about what sin is and why you have to go to confession. How will they know, i know they are adults and should know, but what if they don't. I just wish the priest would let people know and why, once in a while. They never talk about it in my parish and most in my area, or people would know this. If a priest would educate some Catholics who don't know the faith, this would be a great thing for the Church. I think it would also get rid of most of the arguments betwwen Catholics.

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hug we are cool! I understand!

Feb 24th 2013 new

My parish priest is available for confessions daily, either before or after Mass and or by appointment. It would be easier if a priest could tell me my sins, instead of him listening to me.

I usually go every week. I occasionally will try and talk myself out of it, then I hear Jesus's words in the scriptures about someone thinking they have no sin. Besides one doesn't have to wait to commit a mortal sin, venial sins and imperfections will do. It always feels so good to be cleansed and healed...a new beginning. I count on the graces from these two sacraments (Eucharist and Reconciliation) to help me through the week.

Feb 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Donna-848472 said: My parish priest is available for confessions daily, either before or after Mass and or by appoin...
(Quote) Donna-848472 said:

My parish priest is available for confessions daily, either before or after Mass and or by appointment. It would be easier if a priest could tell me my sins, instead of him listening to me.

I usually go every week. I occasionally will try and talk myself out of it, then I hear Jesus's words in the scriptures about someone thinking they have no sin. Besides one doesn't have to wait to commit a mortal sin, venial sins and imperfections will do. It always feels so good to be cleansed and healed...a new beginning. I count on the graces from these two sacraments (Eucharist and Reconciliation) to help me through the week.

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What a beautiful practice Donna...!!! I went to confession weekly a couple of times through Lent & remember thinking I didn't realise how many times I tell Our Lord NO in a week. I don't believe I was being a bit scrupulous either. It was a real eye opener! I go monthly now, but I really think I did much better when I had a biweekly habit... Thank you...You've inspired me... rose

Feb 24th 2013 new

Thomas, maybe they know, but they are hiding from the truth. Perhaps their position seems more important to them than do faith and morals.

Feb 24th 2013 new

rose You are welcome Debbie...it is not always easy to go...I just try and make it a practice. Pope John Paul II inspired me.

Feb 24th 2013 new
(Quote) Mary-814080 said: Thomas, someone told them, but I never heard that at the beginning of Mass the confiteor we ask for forgive...
(Quote) Mary-814080 said:

Thomas, someone told them, but I never heard that at the beginning of Mass the confiteor we ask for forgiveness that it substituted for confession. I was also told you only need to go to confession once in your life and it better be good. Have they told you that one? It depends on their upbringing, and need to confess. We all have venial sins but how often do we as adults commit mortal sins.
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To all, what I told Thomas that there is a reason his relatives believe what they believe, that is why I brought up the subject of what I had heard. Do we need to go to confession, the answer is yes. It makes us feel good.

We can also perform random acts of kindness and treating everyone with respect in person and on here goes a long way.
Feb 24th 2013 new

This is an interesting thread. Like so much that is currently happening in the Church, there are different strains of thought on this subject. I'm not quite sure how to summarize the more recent strain, but it seems to indicate less focus on guilt and sin and more on getting right with God. In that process, some deviate from what the Church teaches in the Catechism, and some are led astray, including my former pastor.

For instance, he told one penitent that he didn't need to go to confession, he could simply confess directly to God, and that the Penitential Rite at the beginning of the Mass (Confiteor) absolved him of his sins, so he could receive Communion even though he did not get to Confession. He often argued with the fellow in Confession about the sins that he confessed--fornication, for instance--saying he needed "intimacy" since he was a divorced man. Then again, he's the same fellow who remarked during an RCIA class, "I have problems with the Church."

I think the newer strain of thought since '65 is a result of, and regretful for, the many Catholics who have left the Church due to the strictness of the teaching, and the guilt it has caused to some--guilt that might even caused suicides, etc. I don't know if anything I've said here is accurate, except the story that my friend related to me about his confession and the pastor's reply. As someone who knows the traditional teaching quite well, I have struggled to understand the subtle shift, if there has been one, since the Sacrament was re-named Reconciliation.

So, your comments on this are welcome.

Feb 24th 2013 new

I went to a service just outside LA on Easter Sunday a few years back, and an older priest there interrupted me before Mass because I was praying the Rosary, and kneeling next to a lady friend there who he evidently knew. He said, "Stop being so serious here and be more focused on each other."

Later during the Mass, he welcomed the many twice a year attendees and reminded them they only needed to attend Mass at Easter and Christmas, again accentuating the love of Christ over the ritual of the Mass.

I get confused, but in the end I know I need to read the Catechism and follow it.

Feb 24th 2013 new
(Quote) Tom-919560 said: This is an interesting thread. Like so much that is currently happening in the Church, there are different strai...
(Quote) Tom-919560 said:

This is an interesting thread. Like so much that is currently happening in the Church, there are different strains of thought on this subject. I'm not quite sure how to summarize the more recent strain, but it seems to indicate less focus on guilt and sin and more on getting right with God. In that process, some deviate from what the Church teaches in the Catechism, and some are led astray, including my former pastor.



For instance, he told one penitent that he didn't need to go to confession, he could simply confess directly to God, and that the Penitential Rite at the beginning of the Mass (Confiteor) absolved him of his sins, so he could receive Communion even though he did not get to Confession. He often argued with the fellow in Confession about the sins that he confessed--fornication, for instance--saying he needed "intimacy" since he was a divorced man. Then again, he's the same fellow who remarked during an RCIA class, "I have problems with the Church."



I think the newer strain of thought since '65 is a result of, and regretful for, the many Catholics who have left the Church due to the strictness of the teaching, and the guilt it has caused to some--guilt that might even caused suicides, etc. I don't know if anything I've said here is accurate, except the story that my friend related to me about his confession and the pastor's reply. As someone who knows the traditional teaching quite well, I have struggled to understand the subtle shift, if there has been one, since the Sacrament was re-named Reconciliation.



So, your comments on this are welcome.





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Tom, what you said about your friend now makes sense to what Thomas' relatives heard, but I never heard that one. As for not going to confession because it is too strict I don't agree, it actually allowed people more freedom to choose which way they went to confession, traditional in the box or face to face. I prefer face to face but if it is not available I will go the traditional route. In this year of Faith we pray weekly for the fallen away Catholics who will come back and participate in their faith.
Feb 24th 2013 new

Hi Mary, I was referring to the strictness of the Church's moral teaching.

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