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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Feb 24th 2013 new
(Quote) Jacqueline-556574 said: To many of us, education about The Faith happened when we were children. It needs to be approached i...
(Quote) Jacqueline-556574 said:

To many of us, education about The Faith happened when we were children. It needs to be approached in adulthood, as well---which may be why so many Catholics appear under-educated about their faith. Also, we Catholics depend on our priests for interpretation of the Bible, as much of it is quite complex: much like interpretation of poetry, and requires a theological education, or access to it. If we attend mass regularly we gain much!



RCIA may meet the needs of many for an overall review, as well as bible studies and other classes held at the parishes. Those questions that were never quite answered as children, may become much more clear as an adult. Another good approach is to ask good praciticing Catholics for reading on particular Catholics issues and subjects. You many even find some good suggestions from people here!
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I visit Eastern Orthodox parishes from time to time. They have 98 percent of the same faith as Catholics, but they seem to have a much deeper understanding of the whys about their faith. The history, patristics, etc.

I think the Catholic dioceses could learn a lot from their Eastern Orthodox counterparts when it comes to catechetics. They are much better at it.
Feb 24th 2013 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: My greatest frustration as a convert is just how misinformed and poorly educated so many Catholic...
(Quote) John-220051 said:

My greatest frustration as a convert is just how misinformed and poorly educated so many Catholics are about the faith. It's something I've encountered repeatedly in the nearly 20 years that I have been a Catholic.
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I'm glad John posted this. I was born in the Church, left for about 25 years and came back with new eyes. Still frustrated though. One thing that has helped is I am not attending the Traditional Latin Mass and most of the people really know their faith. We have coffee and donuts after Mass. We talk, share and edify. It takes me an hour to drive to that Mass but I love it. I have never experience that fellowship as a Catholic before though as a protestand I did. I have grown because of that Mass and that church and the priests who say that Mass.


And yes, being Catholic matters!

Feb 24th 2013 new
(Quote) John-220051 said: I visit Eastern Orthodox parishes from time to time. They have 98 percent of the same faith as Catholics, b...
(Quote) John-220051 said:

I visit Eastern Orthodox parishes from time to time. They have 98 percent of the same faith as Catholics, but they seem to have a much deeper understanding of the whys about their faith. The history, patristics, etc.



I think the Catholic dioceses could learn a lot from their Eastern Orthodox counterparts when it comes to catechetics. They are much better at it.
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Hmmm. I have never been to an Eastern Orthodox parish, but being open in my faith, am willing to visit other parishes. Right now I am very happy with the TLM that I attend, and look forward to it each week. The parish is quite a drive for me, but to think that what spurred me to trying it was that my regular parish parking lot was too full, due to new construction going on at the time.
Feb 24th 2013 new
(Quote) Jim-13836 said: I'm glad John posted this. I was born in the Church, left for about 25 years and came bac...
(Quote) Jim-13836 said:




I'm glad John posted this. I was born in the Church, left for about 25 years and came back with new eyes. Still frustrated though. One thing that has helped is I am not attending the Traditional Latin Mass and most of the people really know their faith. We have coffee and donuts after Mass. We talk, share and edify. It takes me an hour to drive to that Mass but I love it. I have never experience that fellowship as a Catholic before though as a protestand I did. I have grown because of that Mass and that church and the priests who say that Mass.




And yes, being Catholic matters!

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I have found that sort of fellowship exists among many Eastern Catholics parishes that use liturgical rites of Eastern Orthodoxy but follow the Pope.
Feb 24th 2013 new

BOY ARE YOU RIGHT! I hope you find the people here on CM more, to the truth of being Catholic.

Mar 1st 2013 new

Elizabeth, it is very beautiful how powerfully the traditions and sacramentals of The Church speak to you. It's really nice to see. And no, Jesus didn't call to "just be nice people." He called us to have a deep relationship with Him.

From there, I think our perspectives may divide. Had the conversation been about "traditional teachings and sacraments" rather than "traditions and sacramentals," I would have agreed 100%. However, I don't think that wearing a crucifix helps me have a deeper relationship with Him. I think I'm in an awkward place in my faith journey in which wearing a crucifix is a tempation to feel superior as a Christian, but that feeling of superiority is a distraction from the end goal and not what Christianity is all about. It all comes down to intent, doesn't it? Two different people can carry a rosary. For one it's a tool to pray and a self-reminder that "I'm not going to be of this world, because I belong to another." For another, it can mean, "Hey, look at me, I'm so awesome because I'm brave enough to carry this in public and prove to you I'm Christian."

Perhaps my perspective - and after all, this is only my perspective - can be be explained using Thomas Merton's analogy of religion as a stained glass window. We make them full of colored glass in shapes and sizes that make beautiful pictures, but the intent of a window - no matter how beautiful - is to let in the light. It is worthless without the light. If we get caught up in the pretty pictures of the window (rites and rituals of religion), we can forget to look through them to the light (God). The window is a very important medium through which we can experience the light, but it is not the light.

Mar 1st 2013 new

(Quote) Jacqueline-556574 said: Hmmm. I have never been to an Eastern Orthodox parish, but being open in my faith, am willi...
(Quote) Jacqueline-556574 said:

Hmmm. I have never been to an Eastern Orthodox parish, but being open in my faith, am willing to visit other parishes. Right now I am very happy with the TLM that I attend, and look forward to it each week. The parish is quite a drive for me, but to think that what spurred me to trying it was that my regular parish parking lot was too full, due to new construction going on at the time.
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I agree with Jacqueline's comments. I would like to experience Eastern liturgies (that are in communion with our pope) as well but I have no idea how to go about it.

Mar 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Elizabeth-942124 said: One of the things that frustrates me the most about being a convert is how many Catholics see...
(Quote) Elizabeth-942124 said:

One of the things that frustrates me the most about being a convert is how many Catholics seem to try and pretend that they can blend in to the secular world. That our traditions and sacramentals are merely superstition, and that maybe all Jesus wanted us to do was to try and be nice people.


But it's not that easy, is it?


Here's a meditation I wrote on the subject. Please tell me your thoughts.


trenchcoatintrospective.wordpress.com

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You've managed to broadcast your message about Catholicism to a wider audience. Oftentimes on CM we find posts relating to this very subject, although more briefly to accomodate space limitations here. To a large extent Catholics have lost their identity. We're supposed to evangelize -- that doesn't require us to go door-to-door as if to peddle our Faith, but evangelize in the sense of setting an example for others to see and notice. Ideally it's done in a way so that it's noticeable and noticed by others so that they say there's something special about that person because of how he/she treats and deals with others, practices high ethical and moral standards, along with outward signs. These don't have to be extraordinary achievements -- just simple, everyday things we get a chance to do. Open doors for someone; help them with their packages (if they are convinced you're not trying to steal them) and dozens of other little things we can do for others just by chance.

We don't have to wear tops, shirts or blouses that say "I'm a Catholic", but we can show it. There are some symbolic items that will point to our Faith also -- wearing a cross or small crucifix, pins from Catholic groups to which we belong; Right-to-Life items such as the famed tiny-feet. Small gestures, such as making the sign of the Cross in public, such as a restaurant. You mentioned several other things in your article as well. How about respect for a funeral procession? If you're driving, do you cut in because you can't wait a few seconds for the procession to pass?

A few years ago, I was touched by seeing a gentleman walking, then stopping as the funeral procession was close to him. He removed his hat and stood there until the procession had passed. Such respect!!! A small thing with an enormous impact.

We've been browbeaten by the media, and some other faith groups to the point where it seems we're embarrassed to let people know we are Catholics. An increasingly secular society puts additional pressure upon us -- it's more difficult for us. We either standfast or cave-in to such pressures.

Years ago, restaurants promoted Lenten specials, especially on Fridays. This practice is so limited now that it's almost non-existent. A couple of major fast-food change offer deals on fish sandwiches but nowhere is there a sign it is a Lenten special.

If we're to be a force to be reckoned with, we need to be more bold, more conscientious and more vocal.

I think a major part of this is our fast paced lives where we don't have the time to think. We're just dashing from place to place -- too occupied for enough downtime to get our bearings. It wears at us and in front of society, it shows.

Mar 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Elizabeth-942124 said: One of the things that frustrates me the most about being a convert is how many Catholics see...
(Quote) Elizabeth-942124 said:

One of the things that frustrates me the most about being a convert is how many Catholics seem to try and pretend that they can blend in to the secular world. That our traditions and sacramentals are merely superstition, and that maybe all Jesus wanted us to do was to try and be nice people.


But it's not that easy, is it?


Here's a meditation I wrote on the subject. Please tell me your thoughts.


trenchcoatintrospective.wordpress.com

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Elizabeth thanks for your thoughts and the challenge.

Mar 2nd 2013 new
(Quote) Elizabeth-942124 said: One of the things that frustrates me the most about being a convert is how many Catholics seem to try and p...
(Quote) Elizabeth-942124 said:

One of the things that frustrates me the most about being a convert is how many Catholics seem to try and pretend that they can blend in to the secular world. That our traditions and sacramentals are merely superstition, and that maybe all Jesus wanted us to do was to try and be nice people.


But it's not that easy, is it?


Here's a meditation I wrote on the subject. Please tell me your thoughts.


trenchcoatintrospective.wordpress.com

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Nice job Elizabeth, very well written, sacramental s help us grow in our faith, we should be proud to share them.
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