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A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
Learn More: Saint Augustine

Feb 26th 2013 new

(Quote) Jim-13836 said: Jim, I read the article. I wanted to say I liked your post. Thanks for posting it. ...
(Quote) Jim-13836 said:


Jim, I read the article. I wanted to say I liked your post. Thanks for posting it.

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Thanks Jim.....I kind of thought(expected really) that the articles author would respond to what I said....

Feb 26th 2013 new

I thought I would add my two cents for what it's worth. I can concur with this guy's comments about lousy homilies. It used to drive me nuts. I left the church for about 24 years. When I came back as a former Baptist who had been exposed to more of the Bible and had done quite bit of bible reading and studying. I came back with new eyes and I guess new ears. Then I relocated to northwestern PA and eventually discovered the Traditional Latin Mass. The homilies were awesome. It took some getting used to the Latin. Fortunately I love foreign languages so I am confortable with it. But the homilies blew me away. And I have never experienced fellowship as a Catholic as I do now. We have coffee and donuts after Mass and sometimes even go out for more coffee after that. A few older catholics have taken me under their wings to help bring me up to speed on both the Latin Mass and church doctrine. Even though it is a one hour drive to Mass I am so grateful. I am so spolied.


I think the quality of the homilies comes down to the priest. In the beginning the priests who said the Latin Mass were older. Fr. Robert Levis of EWTN fame was one of them (btw. he fell about a year ago, and broke his hip and recovery, at the age of 91, has been slow so please pray for him). Our current pastor is equally good in my opinion. I would go regardless but because of this Latin Mass, these priests and this congregation I have really grown as a Catholic. I only wish it were a bigger congregation.


In conclusion I disagree with the title here. I was once a conservative Evangelical and now I am very glad I came back to the only church Jesus Himself founded. That's my (greatly condensed) story and I'm sticking to it.

Feb 27th 2013 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: What does Jesus say about this? Jesus again in reply spoke to them in parables, saying, &q...
(Quote) David-364112 said:

What does Jesus say about this?

Jesus again in reply spoke to them in parables, saying, "The kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son. He dispatched his servants to summon the invited guests to the feast, but they refused to come. A second time he sent other servants, saying, 'Tell those invited: "Behold, I have prepared my banquet, my calves and fattened cattle are killed, and everything is ready; come to the feast."' Some ignored the invitation and went away, one to his farm, another to his business. The rest laid hold of his servants, mistreated them, and killed them. The king was enraged and sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his servants, 'The feast is ready, but those who were invited were not worthy to come. Go out, therefore, into the main roads and invite to the feast whomever you find.' The servants went out into the streets and gathered all they found, bad and good alike, and the hall was filled with guests. But when the king came in to meet the guests he saw a man there not dressed in a wedding garment. He said to him, 'My friend, how is it that you came in here without a wedding garment?' But he was reduced to silence. Then the king said to his attendants, 'Bind his hands and feet, and cast him into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.' Many are invited, but few are chosen."

Mt 22:1-14


Sounds very harsh. (Jesus was talking to the very men, who, days later would falsely accuse him of crimes and bring about his crucifixion.) But this parable also illustrates the extent to which God is willing to go to gather in people who ARE WILLING to serve him. We also see what happens to those who those who rejected this great grace: i.e. those who refused his invitations and the man without the wedding garment.


Do we really want to say and do things designed to exclude people from this great feast?


Why not do whatever we can to promote the integration and retention of souls in the Church?




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i think non-catholics are at the feast as well. not as close to the center of things.so sure lets have open arms and lots of encouragement--but we shouldnt have notions about who is at the feast and who isnt. that reminds me just a touch (tho not exactly) of the evangelicals who believe there is the saved club and the unsaved club.

Feb 27th 2013 new

+

Saw this in a blog by an Orthodox Christian who was reporting on one of the recent scandals in the Catholic Church. It was sent to him by a Catholic reader and he published it. I think it's quite beautiful:

"And, yet, Rod, I love this (Catholic) Church and know that we’re all stuck with each other, we’re all in it together. There is nowhere else to go; no imagined, hoped-for Church; no self-selected community of the like-minded. This is the only Church there is, and we must love it and all of its members the same way that God loves us all. As Karl Rahner once put it:

“Could we not say to God: Here is someone with whom I cannot get on. She belongs to you. You made her. If you do not will her to be the way she is, at least you allow her to be that way. Dear God, I want to put up with her the way that you put up with me. Would we not find our heart a little lighter, more at ease, more patient?” (The Great Church Year, 379)

Feb 27th 2013 new

+

Jesus is really, truly present at each Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Even if the homily is boring, even if the music isn't to our liking, Jesus comes to us in utmost humility under the appearnace of bread and wine - He, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, gives us His entire self, body, blood, soul and divinity and allows us sinners to consume Himself who IS Goodness, Beauty, Truth, Love. I am writing this for myself, as I often complain about the above (boring homilies, sappy music, etc.). Woe is me to lose sight of the greatest miracle in the world that takes place at each Catholic Mass and Orthodox Liturgy!

Feb 27th 2013 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: The lack of community in many parishes is a serious problem that causes many to leave. It's a...
(Quote) John-220051 said:

The lack of community in many parishes is a serious problem that causes many to leave. It's a major reason that my Dad left the Church before I was born.
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I think the lack of community is something that some of the changes of Vatican II hoped to address. I hear this a lot, and we work very hard in our parish at having greeters, trying to draw people in, having monthly potlucks, etc. Every parish is different and the dynamics are always different, even changing priests can upset the dynamic of a parish. But, one of the things I have noticed is that many people will complain about the lack of community but do nothing to try to develop it themselves. Or despite all of the announcements and bulletin notices they still don't participate because no one asked them. I think it can also be a result of competing secular interests such as sports that drew people into social circles not centered around the Church. We have a Bunko group we started like twelve years ago now, there are twelve of us (women) and we meet once a month, others have come and gone and we have included a lot of women over the years that are substitutes, some who are not Catholic, in fact currently three of them and their husbands are in the RCIA class and will be received at Easter. We have the Deacon's potluck the last Sunday of the month and have drawn in a lot of people through Knights and Altar Society. We also have a lot of small groups that just keep on meeting. We don't always get it right and some will always slip through even though we try to invite them. But, sometimes we ourselves have to make that first step toward building a community and it usually starts with just saying hi, my name is Bert and I'd like to help out with the Meager Meal on Friday. believe me if Bert said that to me, I'd have in the middle of it in a heartbeat lol :-)) or if I saw him and even thought he might be interested in getting into the community, I'd try to find a way to pull him in.

Feb 28th 2013 new
(Quote) Jan-672216 said: + Saw this in a blog by an Orthodox Christian who was reporting on one of the recent scandals in t...
(Quote) Jan-672216 said:

+



Saw this in a blog by an Orthodox Christian who was reporting on one of the recent scandals in the Catholic Church. It was sent to him by a Catholic reader and he published it. I think it's quite beautiful:



"And, yet, Rod, I love this (Catholic) Church and know that we’re all stuck with each other, we’re all in it together. There is nowhere else to go; no imagined, hoped-for Church; no self-selected community of the like-minded. This is the only Church there is, and we must love it and all of its members the same way that God loves us all. As Karl Rahner once put it:



“Could we not say to God: Here is someone with whom I cannot get on. She belongs to you. You made her. If you do not will her to be the way she is, at least you allow her to be that way. Dear God, I want to put up with her the way that you put up with me. Would we not find our heart a little lighter, more at ease, more patient?” (The Great Church Year, 379)

--hide--


Rod Dreher is a former Catholic who left because of the abuse scandals. He told me that he was intimidated by Abp. Chaput who tried to personally get him to stop writing about them.
Feb 28th 2013 new
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said: I think the lack of community is something that some of the changes of Vatican II hoped to add...
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said:



I think the lack of community is something that some of the changes of Vatican II hoped to address. I hear this a lot, and we work very hard in our parish at having greeters, trying to draw people in, having monthly potlucks, etc. Every parish is different and the dynamics are always different, even changing priests can upset the dynamic of a parish. But, one of the things I have noticed is that many people will complain about the lack of community but do nothing to try to develop it themselves. Or despite all of the announcements and bulletin notices they still don't participate because no one asked them. I think it can also be a result of competing secular interests such as sports that drew people into social circles not centered around the Church. We have a Bunko group we started like twelve years ago now, there are twelve of us (women) and we meet once a month, others have come and gone and we have included a lot of women over the years that are substitutes, some who are not Catholic, in fact currently three of them and their husbands are in the RCIA class and will be received at Easter. We have the Deacon's potluck the last Sunday of the month and have drawn in a lot of people through Knights and Altar Society. We also have a lot of small groups that just keep on meeting. We don't always get it right and some will always slip through even though we try to invite them. But, sometimes we ourselves have to make that first step toward building a community and it usually starts with just saying hi, my name is Bert and I'd like to help out with the Meager Meal on Friday. believe me if Bert said that to me, I'd have in the middle of it in a heartbeat lol :-)) or if I saw him and even thought he might be interested in getting into the community, I'd try to find a way to pull him in.

--hide--


Perhaps the laity need to convey their needs to their pastors. I don't necessarily like the happy clappy Evangelical megachurch because of what I see as the movement's catering to superficial Madison Avenue marketing, but they are good at building community.

Considering how big most Roman Catholic parishes are maybe they could learn something about building community outside of Mass from them.
Feb 28th 2013 new

I wish it were easier to build community and to motivate people to get to know these "strangers" who sit next to them in the pews every Sunday! I know my parish offers many activities throughout the week, but for some reason they are so poorly attended. Perhaps people find it hard enough to spare an hour for the Lord every Sunday. boggled

Sometimes I can't help but feel that we will never truly be unified, especially when I see people running out of mass straight from receiving the Eucharist. I'm not judging, but I just wonder if we will ever really come together. crossfingers

Feb 28th 2013 new

(Quote) Noemi-900477 said: I wish it were easier to build community and to motivate people to get to know these "strang...
(Quote) Noemi-900477 said:

I wish it were easier to build community and to motivate people to get to know these "strangers" who sit next to them in the pews every Sunday! I know my parish offers many activities throughout the week, but for some reason they are so poorly attended. Perhaps people find it hard enough to spare an hour for the Lord every Sunday.

Sometimes I can't help but feel that we will never truly be unified, especially when I see people running out of mass straight from receiving the Eucharist. I'm not judging, but I just wonder if we will ever really come together.

--hide--


I have wondered the very same thing. I am grateful that the Latin Mass I attend has coffee and donuts afterward (donations accepted) that is run by us, not the church. Whenever someone new comes to Mass I invite them to join us and usually not successfully. But then again I have never experienced this before in a Catholic Church. It's also said that we are so small. With the exception of a young married couple with a beautiful baby boy, of the regular attendees at 54 years of age I am the youngest member. This has advantages and disdvantages, of course.

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