Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free
A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
Learn More: Saint Augustine

03/03/2013 new

(Quote) Tiffiany-902101 said: This was an interesting article. As a former Evangelical Protestant who converted to Catholicism &quo...
(Quote) Tiffiany-902101 said: This was an interesting article. As a former Evangelical Protestant who converted to Catholicism "saw the light" as I call it--I can understand some of what he is saying. There is a lack of teaching on Biblical issues within certain parishes, undoubtedly. But, there is also a lack within certain Protestant--even Protestant Evangelical--churches. On thing that people should realize is that is is no one's responsibility to teach your child the Word of God, proper Doctrine, morals, values, etc. but the parents' responsibility. People should not think that by sending their children to Catholic school that they will come out with the way they intentioned--which is often with a sense of right from wrong and an understanding of the Truth. I know plenty of cradle Catholics who are more ignorant about the Church, Christianity, Catholicism, and morality than I ever have been. At the end of the day, attending Mass and a Catholic education (if that is what one chooses for their child) is only meant to reinforce--not REPLACE--what it is the parents' duty to teach. Children are a gift from God and one day their caretakers (which are usually the parents) will be held responsible by God for the teaching and upbringing they did or did not give them. Now, once children reach a certain age, they may go their own way. This is inevitable. However, a good Catholic, doctrinally-sound foundation should begin before the child is even conceived (eg praying for that child) and continued throughout their upbringing. The parents are the ones to blame here, not the Church or individual parishes.
--hide--

I think you have hit on the problem. It is the parents' duty to form their children. If a child is unformed, one can't help but look to the parents (or other primary caregiver and the baptismal sponsors) as having primary fault in the matter.

As the Holy Father Pius XI wrote in Casti Connubii (on chaste wedlock):

"16. The blessing of offspring, however, is not completed by the mere begetting of them, but something else must be added, namely the proper education of the offspring. For the most wise God would have failed to make sufficient provision for children that had been born, and so for the whole human race, if He had not given to those to whom He had entrusted the power and right to beget them, the power also and the right to educate them. For no one can fail to see that children are incapable of providing wholly for themselves, even in matters pertaining to their natural life, and much less in those pertaining to the supernatural, but require for many years to be helped, instructed, and educated by others. Now it is certain that both by the law of nature and of God this right and duty of educating their offspring belongs in the first place to those who began the work of nature by giving them birth, and they are indeed forbidden to leave unfinished this work and so expose it to certain ruin. But in matrimony provision has been made in the best possible way for this education of children that is so necessary, for, since the parents are bound together by an indissoluble bond, the care and mutual help of each is always at hand.

"17. Since, however, We have spoken fully elsewhere on the Christian education of youth,[18] let Us sum it all up by quoting once more the words of St. Augustine: 'As regards the offspring it is provided that they should be begotten lovingly and educated religiously,'[19] -- and this is also expressed succinctly in the Code of Canon Law -- 'The primary end of marriage is the procreation and the education of children.'[20]

"18. Nor must We omit to remark, in fine, that since the duty entrusted to parents for the good of their children is of such high dignity and of such great importance, every use of the faculty given by God for the procreation of new life is the right and the privilege of the married state alone, by the law of God and of nature, and must be confined absolutely within the sacred limits of that state.

"80. ... This sacredness of marriage which is intimately connected with religion and all that is holy, arises from the divine origin we have just mentioned, from its purpose which is the begetting and education of children for God, and the binding of man and wife to God through Christian love and mutual support; and finally it arises from the very nature of wedlock, whose institution is to be sought for in the farseeing Providence of God, whereby it is the means of transmitting life, thus making the parents the ministers, as it were, of the Divine Omnipotence. To this must be added that new element of dignity which comes from the sacrament, by which the Christian marriage is so ennobled and raised to such a level, that it appeared to the Apostle as a great sacrament, honorable in every way."


03/04/2013 new

(Quote) Derek-947133 said: Amen! It's too easy to blame the pastor, the parish council, lousy music, b...
(Quote) Derek-947133 said:

Amen! It's too easy to blame the pastor, the parish council, lousy music, bland icons, etc. Even if parents bring their children to Mass each Sunday and send them to Catholic school, if their hearts aren't in it, their kids will pick up on that and learn to think that God and prayer is a waste of time.

I'm reminded of G.K. Chesterton, who once was asked, 'What's wrong with the world?' and he replied 'I am'. I think the same can be said for the problems of the Church.

--hide--

Thanks, Derek! I would agree with you. We need to start examining ourselves as the problem and not the Church or its clergy. This goes for Protestants AND Catholics.

03/27/2013 new

It's just altogether too easy to take potshots at the Catholic Church.

Yes, plenty of Catholics don't know their Bibles. What's new there? Protestants aren't any better, because reading rightly requires starting with the right set of axioms. If you have plenty of experience reading the Bible assuming a Reformed perspective, then you can only proudly claim experience in doing something the wrong way for a long time.

The Church is rich with potential, yet many don't bother to seek that potential. We have heroic saints. We have genuine pastors and the bodily presence of Christ in our service. We don't just seek to submit to the Scriptures, we seek to participate in them and annually to participate in the joy and sorrow of the Church throughout history.

It's right there for the taking, folks. Wisdom cries out in the streets.

04/02/2013 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: They have cultural and ethnic bonds to unite them. Traditionally, Roman Catholics (i...
(Quote) David-364112 said:


They have cultural and ethnic bonds to unite them. Traditionally, Roman Catholics (in the USA at least) don't socialize much at Church.



--hide--


Actually, locally, we have a lot of church based socials, but they mostly started (except for the country parish, where the parish is the uniting point for the farmhouses in a three mile radius) because of the fact that the Protestants use socials and social time to draw people in. I was a conservative Evangelical and became Catholic. The only thing I have trouble with is our non-transparent Parish Council. They don't publish minutes, didn't publish a budget until I raised Hail Columbia with a couple other parishioners, and don't represent our interests or seek our opinions on very much at all. Very dysfunctional. But, I know that this is only my local parish, that other parishes put out an agenda, gather information, share information about their activities, etc. Ours likes to be secretive, but it just makes everyone have contempt at times. . . they don't bring anything to a parish vote, including very large expenditures! That is different from most churches, regardless of whether they are Protestant or not.

04/03/2013 new
1st of all. The reason most people leave the Catholic church despite the fact that they might agree with it's teachings is that they say it is to hard. 2nd if an evangelical or Protestant is thinking about joining the church expecting that the church is going to adapt the beliefs of the modern western culture. They should think again and stay where they are as the church will remain with the same message it was founded spoon which has survived much more than the petty needs of western civilization today.
04/03/2013 new

(Quote) Lynn-189934 said: Actually, locally, we have a lot of church based socials, but they mostly started (ex...
(Quote) Lynn-189934 said:


Actually, locally, we have a lot of church based socials, but they mostly started (except for the country parish, where the parish is the uniting point for the farmhouses in a three mile radius) because of the fact that the Protestants use socials and social time to draw people in. I was a conservative Evangelical and became Catholic. The only thing I have trouble with is our non-transparent Parish Council. They don't publish minutes, didn't publish a budget until I raised Hail Columbia with a couple other parishioners, and don't represent our interests or seek our opinions on very much at all. Very dysfunctional. But, I know that this is only my local parish, that other parishes put out an agenda, gather information, share information about their activities, etc. Ours likes to be secretive, but it just makes everyone have contempt at times. . . they don't bring anything to a parish vote, including very large expenditures! That is different from most churches, regardless of whether they are Protestant or not.

--hide--



You'd be shocked by what goes on in the Church in this country. It's a very dark place. Huge real estate scams, vanishing money, widespread abuse and misconduct. What goes on in many a diocese would destroy the faith of a devout person who was not prepared for reality.

04/04/2013 new

(Quote) Sean-851370 said: dontconvert.wordpress.com.
(Quote) Sean-851370 said:

dontconvert.wordpress.com


Bishops should read stuff like this. Unfortunately, they probably don't.

--hide--
Personally, his writings seem like a bunch of mule muffins.

Sour grapes and a bad attitude didn't help him.

04/04/2013 new

(Quote) Sean-851370 said: You'd be shocked by what goes on in the Church in this country. It's a very da...
(Quote) Sean-851370 said:




You'd be shocked by what goes on in the Church in this country. It's a very dark place. Huge real estate scams, vanishing money, widespread abuse and misconduct. What goes on in many a diocese would destroy the faith of a devout person who was not prepared for reality.

--hide--
I'm sure we would agree that some abuses have occured, but where is the documentation to back up your claim that it's as widespread as you state?

04/04/2013 new

(Quote) Eric-941851 said: 1st of all. The reason most people leave the Catholic church despite the fact that they might agree with ...
(Quote) Eric-941851 said: 1st of all. The reason most people leave the Catholic church despite the fact that they might agree with it's teachings is that they say it is to hard. 2nd if an evangelical or Protestant is thinking about joining the church expecting that the church is going to adapt the beliefs of the modern western culture. They should think again and stay where they are as the church will remain with the same message it was founded spoon which has survived much more than the petty needs of western civilization today.
--hide--
Greetings, Eric -- and welcome to the CM forums, first of all. Hopefully, you'll join us often and voice your thoughts and opinions.

Your point should be well taken. The Catholic Church is counter-cultural, and has been since it was established. It does not "go with the flow". If it did, that would be its downfall. The goal is to remain rock-solid and maintain faithfulness to its doctrines. That's what sets it apart from other faith groups. The Church is NOT a democratic institution. The people don't vote on what the doctrines should be.

It doesn't hurt to reflect on that.

04/04/2013 new

(Quote) Gary-936836 said: It's just altogether too easy to take potshots at the Catholic Church. Yes, plenty of C...
(Quote) Gary-936836 said:

It's just altogether too easy to take potshots at the Catholic Church.

Yes, plenty of Catholics don't know their Bibles. What's new there? Protestants aren't any better, because reading rightly requires starting with the right set of axioms. If you have plenty of experience reading the Bible assuming a Reformed perspective, then you can only proudly claim experience in doing something the wrong way for a long time.

The Church is rich with potential, yet many don't bother to seek that potential. We have heroic saints. We have genuine pastors and the bodily presence of Christ in our service. We don't just seek to submit to the Scriptures, we seek to participate in them and annually to participate in the joy and sorrow of the Church throughout history.

It's right there for the taking, folks. Wisdom cries out in the streets.

--hide--
Most people would agree that Catholics aren't really great at reciting chapter and verse as if they had memorized the Bible. What's important is to know what's in the Bible, and having an understanding of it -- at least as much as the human mind can grasp with it's finite capacity.

Memorizing Biblical passages, or even understanding them isn't going to get the job done. One has to LIVE the messages of the Gospel. That to all.

Posts 51 - 60 of 65