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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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Mar 9th 2013 new

I think we have a lot of people who "grew up Catholic" but never experienced a real conversion nor were given an adult understanding of the Faith. We were just talking about this at retreat last weekend.

If people are hurting because of something the Church or someone in the Church, I think it is our job to listen and to help them know that we care about them. We can be a light on the pathway of life.;)



Mar 12th 2013 new

(Quote) Brad-937504 said: Well said, Naomi. And it's already happening. In the Diocese of Maine, we've already had at least...
(Quote) Brad-937504 said: Well said, Naomi. And it's already happening. In the Diocese of Maine, we've already had at least two missionary priests from India. Given the large number of non-practicing Catholics here, the missionary priests are most welcome.
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I don't know about the rest of you fellas and lasses, but I love missionary priests! IN the last year I"ve met several from Africa, a few from the Phillipines, and several from the Pacific Islands. They bring a world view that is different and oftentimes reflective of great poverty and suffering, and yet their faith and love of God shines through. Too many people in the West are loosing their faith because God doesn't get them a mercedes or because they break a leg and get an infection so obviously God doesn't exist. Yet, here are priests and nuns who grew up in mud shacks, went to school in a hot, dirt floored, questionably engineered building with 70 other kids, who knew poverty and hunger and suffering that puts our little Westernised complaints to shame. And still they follow God!

Of course, I've often heard the atheist critical rant that "religion" particuarly Catholicism, is exploding in third world nations because they're all uneducated idiots who drink diarrohea water. So obviously us religious are all a pack of dunces compared to our much superior atheist betters.

[Funny thing is, the loudest mouthed atheist I know left school at 14 and works by stocking shelves at the supermarket... yet priests and nuns who study for years and obtain university degrees... they're the morons].

Mar 12th 2013 new

Well, I figure I might as well add in my two cents here.


Just so I can make clear where I'm coming from I'm a 'neo-convert'. I am one of those people who was raised Catholic, left the church, and now I'm trying to struggle my way back. In the time I've been re-learning the Catholic faith a few things stood out to me.


First, there isn't much of a support network for unmarried young adults. Churches in larger cities tend to have these, but you get away from those areas, and that age group is pretty much expected to find their own way in the church. While I doubt that the group of people that are non-practicing Catholics is exlucive to the 'young adult' age range, I am certain a good percentage is.


Second, one of the biggest challenges of Catholocism in my experience is that it is a moderate religion. We must mind the virtues and try to avoid both the defect and the excess of them. In a society that pushes to show no restraint either direction, attempting to be a moderate person is extremely difficult, and without a proper support network, extremely lonely.


Compound these two factors with a general prejudice against Catholics that can be prevalent in any area not predominantly Catholic, and many will try to hide any overt signs that they are Catholic. The main issue that plagues my generation, from my perspective, is culture shock. If we were not raised in an overtly Catholic home, taught in a Catholic school, or really socialized in a Catholic setting, we can find it difficult to balance our Catholic heritage with the society around us.

Mar 13th 2013 new

(Quote) Naomi-698107 said: There's 1.2 billion of us world wide. we're essentially the largest religion. Islam is ca...
(Quote) Naomi-698107 said:

There's 1.2 billion of us world wide. we're essentially the largest religion. Islam is catching up and is probably going to over take us in the next few years though.

The problem with the "oh, there's so few Catholics around, must be because we're dying out" mindset often comes from people in the West, I see/hear it a lot from Americans - and not just the ones I meet online. It seems to be a national personality trait that you're very inward looking and aren't really interested in what happens beyond your boarders unless it directly affects your national interest. I mean no insult, I'm just telling you how a lot of non-Americans view you guys.

America and other Western Nations aren't the be all and end all of Catholicism. It is from the developing nations that the faith is exploding, and in very traditional and passionate ways. It'll be their priests and nuns coming to mission to our nations soon enough, just watch.

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Completely agree. In fact, the Catholic church is in it one of it's biggest growth periods in its history! But most of this growth is happening in Asia and Africa so most westerns are not aware of it.

Mar 13th 2013 new

(Quote) Justin-32820 said: Completely agree. In fact, the Catholic church is in it one of it's biggest grow...
(Quote) Justin-32820 said:


Completely agree. In fact, the Catholic church is in it one of it's biggest growth periods in its history! But most of this growth is happening in Asia and Africa so most westerns are not aware of it.

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I have this desore to meet a priest who served in the former Eastern European countries under communism. I want to know from them, how they survived. I think as a country, we are heading in that direction.

Mar 14th 2013 new

(Quote) Joshua-800257 said: First, there isn't much of a support network for unmarried young adults. Churches in larger ...
(Quote) Joshua-800257 said:

First, there isn't much of a support network for unmarried young adults. Churches in larger cities tend to have these, but you get away from those areas, and that age group is pretty much expected to find their own way in the church. While I doubt that the group of people that are non-practicing Catholics is exlucive to the 'young adult' age range, I am certain a good percentage is.


Second, one of the biggest challenges of Catholocism in my experience is that it is a moderate religion. We must mind the virtues and try to avoid both the defect and the excess of them. In a society that pushes to show no restraint either direction, attempting to be a moderate person is extremely difficult, and without a proper support network, extremely lonely.


Compound these two factors with a general prejudice against Catholics that can be prevalent in any area not predominantly Catholic, and many will try to hide any overt signs that they are Catholic. The main issue that plagues my generation, from my perspective, is culture shock. If we were not raised in an overtly Catholic home, taught in a Catholic school, or really socialized in a Catholic setting, we can find it difficult to balance our Catholic heritage with the society around us.

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Joshua! Welcome to the forums, and thank you for these insights! I think you have hit some of this completely on the head. It IS difficult to balance our Catholic heritage with the society around us - especially in the public sector, where things are so radically different. I was coming back from Confession a while ago, and flipped on my radio, and just began to listen to a song with lyrics I hadn't paid attention to before (I just liked the music portion) and because I was finally paying attention specifically to the lyrics, I was shocked to actually hear them for the first time! I went to a Catholic college, and just getting out of college the first year and finding a place/group that I belonged in was difficult to a degree because so many of us moved different places.

As for not having a Catholic group, why not start on yourself? Talk to the priest at your parish and see if there is the possibility about reserving a room, or advertising a young adult Catholic group. It could be a Bible Study, or a book study (we're doing Praying with St. Francis of Assisi right now - a three-four page "chapter" a week has been our pace. Plus we have other hang outs once a month or so that are for socializing.

Mar 14th 2013 new

(Quote) Jim-13836 said: I have this desore to meet a priest who served in the former Eastern European countries...
(Quote) Jim-13836 said:


I have this desore to meet a priest who served in the former Eastern European countries under communism. I want to know from them, how they survived. I think as a country, we are heading in that direction.

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Heck, the American Church probably has closed more churches than the Polish communist government did. I know Polish immigrants here in town who said that the communists in Poland left churches alone. In Russia the situation was different and many churches and monasteries were destroyed. When we dealt with church closings in town, the Polish immigrants said that the communists were more respectful of churches than the American Church. Secularism is more dangerous in my opinion. The communists couldn't break the Church in Poland but secularism will. The proganada of Moscow is nothing compared to that of Madison Avenue.

Mar 14th 2013 new

(Quote) Sean-851370 said: Heck, the American Church probably has closed more churches than the Polish communist ...
(Quote) Sean-851370 said:




Heck, the American Church probably has closed more churches than the Polish communist government did. I know Polish immigrants here in town who said that the communists in Poland left churches alone. In Russia the situation was different and many churches and monasteries were destroyed. When we dealt with church closings in town, the Polish immigrants said that the communists were more respectful of churches than the American Church. Secularism is more dangerous in my opinion. The communists couldn't break the Church in Poland but secularism will. The proganada of Moscow is nothing compared to that of Madison Avenue.

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clapWell said Sean!

Mar 14th 2013 new

(Quote) Bernard-2709 said: Well said Sean!
(Quote) Bernard-2709 said:

Well said Sean!

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Thanks! Yes, we're dealing with a psychotic warmonger in the White House who attacks churches. Fortunately Putin seems to be more rational. People are too obsessed with communism and the evil empire. The US and the Soviet Union (Russia) both have had nutcases as leaders at points during their history. The trick always has been to play these two huge powers against each other. The last thing the titans of finance in New York and London want is Russia and the US as allies.

Mar 14th 2013 new

(Quote) Sean-851370 said: (Quote) Bernard-2709 said: Well said Sean! Thank...
(Quote) Sean-851370 said:

Quote:
Bernard-2709 said:

Well said Sean!





Thanks! Yes, we're dealing with a psychotic warmonger in the White House who attacks churches. Fortunately Putin seems to be more rational. People are too obsessed with communism and the evil empire. The US and the Soviet Union (Russia) both have had nutcases as leaders at points during their history. The trick always has been to play these two huge powers against each other. The last thing the titans of finance in New York and London want is Russia and the US as allies.

--hide--
I agree.

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