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This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

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Mar 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Lisa-54615 said: Thanks everyone for your responses. I'm doing this diet change not for myself but for my son wh...
(Quote) Lisa-54615 said:

Thanks everyone for your responses. I'm doing this diet change not for myself but for my son who already needs a heart-healthy diet at his age. I will have to do some research on soy products - I didn't realize they were not healthy. Maybe just cutting meat down significantly and eliminating red meat (or like one of you said, the four-legged animals) is more realistic. Giving up dairy would certainly be harder than giving up meat. I tried almond milk once, and it was naaasty. I couldn't stomach it.

I like the idea of eating like Asians eat - the research presented in Forks over Knives was primarily done with asian populations. They were saying that the amount of meat an American eats at one meal would feed the entire family in an Asian culture because they use meat more for taste than for substance.

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Hi Lisa! If you're leaning toward an Asian diet, you may want to read The China Study. Another issue with soy is that it can have an adverse affect on those with thyroid problems. Sweetened coconut-and-almond milk is better altogether and on/in things, but it doesn't taste very good if drinking it straight from the carton. Nothing beats dairy milk in that regard, especially with coffee. I'm not sure I'll ever be able to give up butter! I think going vegan is definitely a process! Chelle

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Mar 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Lisa-54615 said: Thanks everyone for your responses. I'm doing this diet change not for myself but for my son wh...
(Quote) Lisa-54615 said:

Thanks everyone for your responses. I'm doing this diet change not for myself but for my son who already needs a heart-healthy diet at his age. I will have to do some research on soy products - I didn't realize they were not healthy. Maybe just cutting meat down significantly and eliminating red meat (or like one of you said, the four-legged animals) is more realistic. Giving up dairy would certainly be harder than giving up meat. I tried almond milk once, and it was naaasty. I couldn't stomach it.

I like the idea of eating like Asians eat - the research presented in Forks over Knives was primarily done with asian populations. They were saying that the amount of meat an American eats at one meal would feed the entire family in an Asian culture because they use meat more for taste than for substance.

--hide--


I think it's all about keeping the body in its right pH (not too acidic, not too alkaline). A vegan diet is generally prescribed to those with very acidic pH (those susceptible to diseases like diabetes, cancer, etc). Balance is key for normal people and growing children. My mother (an RN) taught us not to eat chicken skin and pork fat when we were young. We'd ask why and she said those are poisonous to the body. She also introduced to me the usage of sunblock as early as puberty, to keep skin young. I grew up thinking that way still do up to the present. I grew up with the ASian diet of green tea, rice, soup noodles, veggies, crops (especially sweet potato), lots of fish (I love sushi too, Lisa!) and meat is only once or twice a month (mostly chicken). At my age, I cannot afford not to eat a little meat because aging muscles need protein. During meal time, I make sure my plate has 80% veggies with other alkaline food and 20% rice or grain. Oh, I eat only when I'm hungry. I do a lot of walking. Mobility is key to remain healthy. I can't sit down for more than an hour. These work for me and so far I feel great.


Balance is key, Lisa. And mobility will keep you healthy too. Hope this helps. hug

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Mar 11th 2013 new

It's a fad, though a fairly long-standing mistaken one, and detrimental to excellent health. There's nothing wrong with eating four legged food sources and, in fact, many more things right. Our bodies are straight out specifically designed for and thrive on it.

Animals are best if you hunt or raise and slaughter them yourself: you have a respect for where it comes from and what goes into it.

Bad, empty calories in meat/pasta? Haha. Go ask any professional/semi-professional athlete, in the pinnacle of human shape, health and conditioning, or their experienced trainers, how much meat and pasta they eat..


Above all, in things healthy: virtus in mediae..

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Mar 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Lisa-54615 said: I'm a big carnivore. But I watched "Forks over Knives" the other day - a documentary ...
(Quote) Lisa-54615 said:

I'm a big carnivore. But I watched "Forks over Knives" the other day - a documentary that talks about (and provides scientific research findings) eating a plant-based and whole grain diet with no meat, eggs or milk. The doctors in the documentary said that eating this way heals all sorts of diseases and gives you more energy. It sounds very appealing, but I imagine planning vegan meals will be very difficult, especially in the beginning. Any vegans out there who can attest to the health beneifts of such a diet? Do you really feel better or is this just a fad?

(If I try this, it would have to be a modified vegan diet that allows fish because life without sushi is just not worth living.)

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Lisa, I have recently been watching lots of food documentaries and would like to recommend some others:

Vegucated (people go vegan for 6 weeks, food cravings, lost weight, changed attitudes).

Food, Inc. (excellent basic info abt the food industry. Also a bestsellin book)

Fat Sick & Nearly Dead (2 guys w/serious health issues try raw juice diets for a limited time w/great success).

One non-food but quite impt documentary is Surviving Progress.

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Mar 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Margo-404841 said: Lisa, I have recently been watching lots of food documentaries and would like to recommend some o...
(Quote) Margo-404841 said:

Lisa, I have recently been watching lots of food documentaries and would like to recommend some others:

Vegucated (people go vegan for 6 weeks, food cravings, lost weight, changed attitudes).

Food, Inc. (excellent basic info abt the food industry. Also a bestsellin book)

Fat Sick & Nearly Dead (2 guys w/serious health issues try raw juice diets for a limited time w/great success).

One non-food but quite impt documentary is Surviving Progress.

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My son has been a pescatarian (fish + vegetarian) for roughly 2 years, has been quite healthy on that diet. He went to Germany for an unpaid internship in January and because it is part of the German experience/diet, decided to start eating meat again. He told me Saturday that his blood pressure is up 30 points, to 160/90. He's 19 years old and is going back to his pescatarin diet.

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Mar 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Lisa-54615 said: Giving up dairy would certainly be harder than giving up meat. I tried almond milk once, and it wa...
(Quote) Lisa-54615 said:

Giving up dairy would certainly be harder than giving up meat. I tried almond milk once, and it was naaasty. I couldn't stomach it.

--hide--
Almond milk is weird...the Best Buy brand of soy milk is the closest tasting to cow's milk that I've ever had. It's practically unnoticeable in cereal. :)

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Mar 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Bridgette-868284 said: Almond milk is weird.... :)
(Quote) Bridgette-868284 said:

Almond milk is weird.... :)

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Everyone has their own tastes, I suppose. I love almond milk; soy milk, not so much.

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Mar 11th 2013 new

I have been vegetarian, and not, and vegan for a while.

I say give it a try. It's not irreversible...see if it works for you.

You have to do alot of planning to eat this way though.

I was what I called "the accidental vegetarian" meaning, I had not planned it, and would be in situations of having to say, well potato chips are vegan, right?

You have to be sure you get enough protein--you have to know what amino acids are in what, and get all of them (complete amino acids).

There is no need to eat animal flesh if you are eat fully thought out diet.

And, Food, Inc. is one of the most harrowing things I have ever seen. Tells you alot about our food and where it comes from.

And the Fat Sick and Nearly Dead movie is really really interesting! Love the guy who did it!

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Mar 11th 2013 new

Let's keep it civil, on topic, with no name calling.

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Mar 11th 2013 new

I personally feel better on a diet that is primarily vegetarian, including dairy, fish and eggs, but I am sceptical about a strict vegan diet. The vegan diet doesn't provided enough vitamin B12. The way I look at it is that it doesn't make sense to choose a diet that doesn't provide an essential nutrient. But if you eat fish, you should be ok. I know some people don't seem to do as well as others as a vegetarian. There is a lot of conflicting information out there regarding diets. I don't think the same thing works for everyone. You will only know if it works for you if you try it. Just make sure you are getting all your essential nutrients. As other have said, biologically we are omnivores.

I also think it is unhealthy to obsess too much about diet. I had a friend who made herself very sick because she was so concerned about eating unhealthily that she was hardly eating. Fortunately, she is beyond that now and looking and feeling great.

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