Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free
A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
Learn More: Saint Augustine

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Tom-112790 said: In most cases i have little problem morally with the death penalty.the people have plenty of time to make ...
(Quote) Tom-112790 said: In most cases i have little problem morally with the death penalty.the people have plenty of time to make peace with God. --But in reality we really hardly have the death penalty in the USA.With endless appeals etc a death row inmate stays there for 20 + yrs often witha good chance of overturn.

Plus --if you know the prison systems at all--the death row people live a lot better than the general population.

So the few that actually DO get the death penalty live better lives and almost as long as the lifers.

IMO life in prison is a much tougher penalty than death.

there are only a handful of executions for thousands of convicted murderers.
--hide--
Tom -- if you have any birthday cake leftover, we can share......maybe????

From the Florida DOC website, the following is a summary of daily life on death row: 3 meals daily; restricted visitors and visitations; showers every other day; must be in handcuffs when outside their cells; mail -- same as civilians; snacks, radios and a 13" tv are allowed; church services watched on closed circuit TV; NO AC; no visitation with other prisoners in common rooms; wearing of orange T-shirts to distinguish them from other prisoners; hourly head count; cell size is 6' x 9'; time is spent in cells except for medical situations, exercise, approved social visitations, legal counsel consultations, media interviews.

Other prisons would have to be checked for living conditions and arrangements.

I agree that life (especially without a chance of parole) is tougher than the death penalty.

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: It should bother you -- and the rest of us. It's another example of injustices commited by the ...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

It should bother you -- and the rest of us. It's another example of injustices commited by the legal system. While it may be the best the world has to offer, it is still nevertheless, flawed. Reasonable efforts should be made to determine if the alleged perpetrator is able to understand the difference between right and wrong. A competent defense attorney should be requesting a psychological examination where mental incapacity might be an issue.

There are efforts, haphazard for now, to improve the quality of mental health care in the US. Perhaps this will bring increased awareness of the problems and a better understanding of how to deal with them.

--hide--
An ex-pat Kiwi who now lives and works in America was telling me of a young man he knows who was told by the prosecutors that if he fought the clarification of his sanity they'd see to it his psych meds were withheld. His lawyer didn't even care.The kid went into an adult prision when he was 16, that was 10 odd years ago, he's still there.

I've seen teh same behaviour in NZL, where people who were clearly nuttier than squirrel poop were called "sane" for the benefit of public revenge. If they're declared mentally unwell, no revenge for the public, no apparently cushy life in a pysch ward.

Then of course, there's the racism of the DP system in America, the imbalance of more poor being executed than rich, and the horrific practice of executing people with mental, intellectual or physical special needs. Its a complete disgrace.

I understand there can be circumstances where the DP is justified, but really only as a last resort "lesser of two evils". The situations I can think where this would be the case: a post nuclear apocalypse where the justice system is in the toilet. Not 2013 in a modern, Western country.

I also understand that there are some people who are very dangerous and will always be a risk to people and the public safety, people who will never really be safe to see the light of day. Yet, the prision system as a whole is not designed to rehabilitate individuals who could benefit from it.

When Christ was talking about the least of these, and visiting people in jail, I don't think he was just refering to the poor innocent schmucks who get railroaded, or the mentally unwell. He was also talking about those who have done terrible things and should be in jail. But they need support also. They don'tloose their humanity or their dignity when they commit crimes of great violence.

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: Tom -- if you have any birthday cake leftover, we can share......maybe???? From the Florida ...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Tom -- if you have any birthday cake leftover, we can share......maybe????

From the Florida DOC website, the following is a summary of daily life on death row: 3 meals daily; restricted visitors and visitations; showers every other day; must be in handcuffs when outside their cells; mail -- same as civilians; snacks, radios and a 13" tv are allowed; church services watched on closed circuit TV; NO AC; no visitation with other prisoners in common rooms; wearing of orange T-shirts to distinguish them from other prisoners; hourly head count; cell size is 6' x 9'; time is spent in cells except for medical situations, exercise, approved social visitations, legal counsel consultations, media interviews.

Other prisons would have to be checked for living conditions and arrangements.

I agree that life (especially without a chance of parole) is tougher than the death penalty.

--hide--



I bet there are people in Africa who would love to have living conditions like that......

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Naomi-698107 said:  
(Quote) Naomi-698107 said:

 

--hide--

> Then of course, there's the racism of the DP system in America,

What racism is that?

> the imbalance of more poor being executed than rich

Perhaps because the poor commit a disproportionate number of the crimes that qualify for the death penalty?

> the horrific practice of executing people with mental, intellectual or physical special needs

I can see where mental and intellectual disabilities may provide extenuating circumstances to warrant exclusion of the death penalty, providing the disability impairs the person's use of reason. I don't see how special physical need are relevant.

 

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Patrick-341178 said: I bet there are people in Africa who would love to have living conditions like that...
(Quote) Patrick-341178 said:




I bet there are people in Africa who would love to have living conditions like that......

--hide--
And elsewhere, including the US, too. But...it's relative to one's present conditions. An important element of consideration is the deprivation of freedom.

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Stephanie-450440 said: I'm sure millions of Jews who were killed by a society following a group mak...
(Quote) Stephanie-450440 said:


I'm sure millions of Jews who were killed by a society following a group making decisions for the "common good of their society" would disagree with that statement .


In our 21st century America, I cannot think of any circumstance that would support killing a man for the "common good of society" and as I stated earlier, I doubt Jesus would either.

--hide--


THe mass murder of Jews is not what the common good of society is. The common good of society, the peace of society as dictated by the conformity to the natural and divine law of God, and those who God has put in charge moving the society in a positive way protecting Truth. For example, the killing of a heretic who is spreading lies and slanders about the Truth, or misleading peoples souls would be for the benefit of a society. Slaughtering Jews as a scapegoat, with no regards to the natural or divine law, is not for the common good of society.

Mar 15th 2013 new

(Quote) Tom-112790 said: In most cases i have little problem morally with the death penalty.the people have plenty of time to make ...
(Quote) Tom-112790 said: In most cases i have little problem morally with the death penalty.the people have plenty of time to make peace with God. --But in reality we really hardly have the death penalty in the USA.With endless appeals etc a death row inmate stays there for 20 + yrs often witha good chance of overturn.

Plus --if you know the prison systems at all--the death row people live a lot better than the general population.

So the few that actually DO get the death penalty live better lives and almost as long as the lifers.

IMO life in prison is a much tougher penalty than death.

there are only a handful of executions for thousands of convicted murderers.
--hide--



They get more time than their victims did and some of the worst cases involved torturing their victims before the murders.

Posts 61 - 67 of 67