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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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The Planck satellite was launched in May 2009 and is a modern version of the WMAP satellite with the aim to very precisely measure light from a particular phase in the development of the universe called the cosmic background radiation (CMB). The light being measured is microwaves, yes the same kind of microwaves which you use to make popcorn or reheat last nights dinner.

The theory tells us that some 300,000 years after the inflation period called the Big Bang, the temperature in the universe had dropped enough that the hydrogen-, helium- and lithium plasma it consisted of could form electrically neutral atoms and so the light was no longer trapped. This is called photon decoupling and the these photons have ever since travelled the universe and as the universe expands the wavelength of the photons increases too.

The light is nearly uniform in all directions but there are small, small variations which is interpreted to be the seeds of the first stars ultimately forming the first galaxies, the first supernovas and the first black holes.

Beside this maesurment of the cosmic backround radiation the Planck satellite also has the following aims:

High resolution detections of both the total intensity and polarization of the primordial CMB anisotropies Creation of a catalogue of galaxy clusters through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect Observations of the gravitational lensing of the CMB, as well as the integrated Sachs–Wolfe effect Observations of bright extragalactic radio (active galactic nuclei) and infrared (dusty galaxy) sources Observations of the Milky Way, including the interstellar medium, distributed synchrotron emission and measurements of the Galactic magnetic field. Studies of the Solar System, including planets, asteroids, comets and the zodiacal light.

Here is a link to a small picture of the cosmic background radiation according to Planck: spaceinimages.esa.int

Mar 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Peter-933860 said: The Planck satellite was launched in May 2009 and is a modern version of the WMAP satellite with ...
(Quote) Peter-933860 said:

The Planck satellite was launched in May 2009 and is a modern version of the WMAP satellite with the aim to very precisely measure light from a particular phase in the development of the universe called the cosmic background radiation (CMB). The light being measured is microwaves, yes the same kind of microwaves which you use to make popcorn or reheat last nights dinner.

The theory tells us that some 300,000 years after the inflation period called the Big Bang, the temperature in the universe had dropped enough that the hydrogen-, helium- and lithium plasma it consisted of could form electrically neutral atoms and so the light was no longer trapped. This is called photon decoupling and the these photons have ever since travelled the universe and as the universe expands the wavelength of the photons increases too.

The light is nearly uniform in all directions but there are small, small variations which is interpreted to be the seeds of the first stars ultimately forming the first galaxies, the first supernovas and the first black holes.

Beside this maesurment of the cosmic backround radiation the Planck satellite also has the following aims:

High resolution detections of both the total intensity and polarization of the primordial CMB anisotropies Creation of a catalogue of galaxy clusters through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect Observations of the gravitational lensing of the CMB, as well as the integrated Sachs–Wolfe effect Observations of bright extragalactic radio (active galactic nuclei) and infrared (dusty galaxy) sources Observations of the Milky Way, including the interstellar medium, distributed synchrotron emission and measurements of the Galactic magnetic field. Studies of the Solar System, including planets, asteroids, comets and the zodiacal light.

Here is a link to a small picture of the cosmic background radiation according to Planck: spaceinimages.esa.int

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This is very interesting, Peter. Thank you for posting it.

Big Bang theory may be a bit controversial on this website I fear.

Mar 24th 2013 new

Thank you Marianne!

Yes I know it might be a bit controversial but I take the risk. I believe this kind of information about the amazing universe we exist in should be shared so people truly can grasp the awesomeness of it all.

Mar 24th 2013 new

*Insert highly intelligent and verbose response here*

I read an article a few weeks ago where astronomers were able to view a previously unknown and very distant galaxy by using the gravitational lensing effect produced by a closer galaxy. This closer galaxy served as a magnifying glass that helped them see a galaxy that otherwise would be invisible to them. Pretty cool stuff!

Mar 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Cory-789423 said: *Insert highly intelligent and verbose response here*I read an article a few weeks ago whe...
(Quote) Cory-789423 said:

*Insert highly intelligent and verbose response here*

I read an article a few weeks ago where astronomers were able to view a previously unknown and very distant galaxy by using the gravitational lensing effect produced by a closer galaxy. This closer galaxy served as a magnifying glass that helped them see a galaxy that otherwise would be invisible to them. Pretty cool stuff!

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Yes this is a bonus of gravity's effect on light. Even though light, in the form of a particle (photon), has no rest-mass it actually gets mass from its motion and this mass is affected by gravity.

Here is a paper on gravitational lensing by a astrophysicist to read for anyone interested: www3.nd.edu

Mar 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Peter-933860 said: Thank you Marianne! Yes I know it might be a bit controversial but I take the risk. I beli...
(Quote) Peter-933860 said:

Thank you Marianne!

Yes I know it might be a bit controversial but I take the risk. I believe this kind of information about the amazing universe we exist in should be shared so people truly can grasp the awesomeness of it all.

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I think you will be pleased to know that on many of the news reports, and in both of the papers I read that night, there
was a reference to what you wrote about.

I am glad that you posted about it.

Mar 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Peter-933860 said: Yes this is a bonus of gravity's effect on light. Even though light, in the form of a particl...
(Quote) Peter-933860 said:

Yes this is a bonus of gravity's effect on light. Even though light, in the form of a particle (photon), has no rest-mass it actually gets mass from its motion and this mass is affected by gravity.

Here is a paper on gravitational lensing by a astrophysicist to read for anyone interested: www3.nd.edu

Is that what explains how light bends?

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Mar 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Cory-789423 said: *Insert highly intelligent and verbose response here*I read an article a few weeks ago whe...
(Quote) Cory-789423 said:

*Insert highly intelligent and verbose response here*

I read an article a few weeks ago where astronomers were able to view a previously unknown and very distant galaxy by using the gravitational lensing effect produced by a closer galaxy. This closer galaxy served as a magnifying glass that helped them see a galaxy that otherwise would be invisible to them. Pretty cool stuff!

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Cory: What do you teach? I wonder if it is science?

Mar 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Peter-933860 said: Yes this is a bonus of gravity's effect on light. Even though light, in the form of a particl...
(Quote) Peter-933860 said:

Yes this is a bonus of gravity's effect on light. Even though light, in the form of a particle (photon), has no rest-mass it actually gets mass from its motion and this mass is affected by gravity.

Here is a paper on gravitational lensing by a astrophysicist to read for anyone interested: www3.nd.edu

--hide--


I've read a few theoretical physics books and while most of it makes sense, other parts are tough to wrap my mind around and gravitational lensing is one of them. Like, how do scientists know if light is being bent by gravity? Can they detect a shift in wavelengths perhaps?

Mar 24th 2013 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: Cory: What do you teach? I wonder if it is science?
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:



Cory: What do you teach? I wonder if it is science?

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I have a love for science as a hobby, but put me in a classroom and I'll likely be the class clown haha. Probably why I did poorly in chemistry in high school embarassed. My teaching degree is in social studies.

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