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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people under 45. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

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Apr 18th 2013 new

Bahar, good thread you have here.

I smoked at least a pack a day for 10 years. For me....the daily ritual of waking up...coughing/wheezing and hacking up stuff every morning ( I know this is gross but I will make a point here) finally got to me. And I was short of breath. It was about this time I read Jim Fixx's book about "Running" that I thought wow.....how liberating! But knew I needed to quit smoking if I wanted to run. (course this was many pounds and many years ago! ha!)

So I started running gradually....and only for very short distances like half-a-mile. When I first started I HATED the cigs but kept smoking anyway...until on day I looked up and saw the 1st of the year was coming around. I prayed, ran...and prayed some more. I felt I could stop. Finally we were celebrating New Years' (though I'm not saying here WAIT until Jan 1st) I stopped. I gave my last un-opened pack to my neighbor who happened to smoke the same brand as me and said "Here Larry....I won't be needing these any more" He looked at me incredulously but nevertheless
respect. That was 30 years ago. Have run in many 5k's, 10k's and various distances including finishing 2 marathons. Now because of foot and back problems I walk. This prescription for quitting isn't for everyone except for these 3 things: 1) you should pray for God's help 2) You should REALLY....I mean REALLY REALLY WANT TO quit 3) Take it ONE DAY AT A TIME. (just quit every morning you wake up...don't look at next year, next month, or next week...or even tomorrow. Just quit EVERY DAY) Hope it helps~

Apr 18th 2013 new

I and several of my friends and relatives have quit smoking using electronic cigarettes. They give you the "action" of smoking, the throat/lung hit of smoking, and the nicotine of smoking, without the unpleasant taste/smell, and without the tar/chemicals of cigarettes. They havn't been around long enough for conclusive studies on health, but they are definitely better than cigarettes. It took a few weeks of trying to switch, but after that I have been smoke free for 3 years. Ecigs give you the feel of smoking, and the nicotine, so its a big boost over just going with patch/gum. (Also costs way less in the long run)

Good luck in your attempts.

Apr 18th 2013 new
Bahar, being an ex-smoker or shall I a QUITTER, which is a good thing I have no experience with the electronic cigarettes, they may work you just get less nicotine in system, similar to the patch. I have been quit almost 6 years and smoked for 25 years. I quit cold turkey when I finally quit.

I would highly recommend FFS (Freedom from Smoking) sponsored by the American Lung Association, it saved me. You have to work the program, its online and they have excellent support groups that if you feel like you got to have that smoke someone will talk you down. I also found doing something with your hands is the best way to keep from lighting up. Before I quit I purchased tootsie roll pops to chew on when I did quit, went through half a bag and gave the rest away. It's not easy, you think you can have just one and tell yourself you can have one with friends while out, but you can't because 24 hours after you have your last cigarette or cigar the nicotine is out of your system, but the urge never goes away.

If you truly want to quit you will do it. I didn't tell anyone in my family or friends I quit smoking for 2 months after I quit, I wanted to be sure I could do it.

Good Luck!!
Apr 18th 2013 new
Jerry you said it better than I did.
Apr 18th 2013 new

(Quote) Mary-814080 said: Jerry you said it better than I did.
(Quote) Mary-814080 said: Jerry you said it better than I did.
--hide--
Well Mary....ALL these posts are good if we help Bahar and others who truly want to quit.

Apr 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Bahar-937890 said:

(Quote) Bahar-937890 said:

Hi frank! Welcome

Hi Pauline, sorry about your husband. You mean he smoked so many cigarettes in one day and then stopped? Am I right? I have heard that some people have done it and were successful, one of my friends told me that after smoking many cigarettes in one day, it was like I hated smoking and was feeling sick in stomach but it helped. She is not smoking anymore.

Lisa, you mean Nicotine Gums or regular gums? Because I have heard that Nicotine Gums cause Mouth Cancer!

--hide--


Bahar,

I do not know if my husband's continuous non-stop smoking made him sick, as he still had the urge to smoke for a few months. But he had decided that day was his last day he would smoke a cigarette in his life; he kept that as he did not touch another cigarette as long as he lived. I am not in favour of smoking non-stop on the day you chose to cease smoking as that itself could have caused a lot of damage to his lungs. I think it was his decision and the knowledge that just one cigarette would lead him to smoking again that helped, and of course our prayers.

Praying you are able to cease smoking.

Apr 19th 2013 new

Bahar:

Although everyone's experience will be different, I smoked two packs a day for almost 20 years (the first ten of which it was still somewhat socially acceptable), after which I decided that I had completely tired of the coughing, shortness of breath, nasty looks, and seemingly never-ending quest to find and buy ever-increasingly expensive cigarettes.

Over the course of a couple of years, I attempted on my own, twice, and without success, to quit "cold turkey," both times eventually giving into the inevitable nicotine cravings that came with passing time.

Finally, on a third attempt (the third time is the charm, right?), I made one more cold-turkey attempt, but this time, I firmly resolved to invoke the power of the Holy Spirit, the power of Whom far exceeds that of any tobacco company, nicotine, or Satan himself, and so each time a craving hit, I invoked that power, praying earnestly and sincerely until each craving passed.

Eventually, and quite quickly, the cravings got farther and farther apart until they ceased completely, and before I knew it, I was smoke-addition free!

Praise God, and cood luck in your quest.

Apr 20th 2013 new

Hi Bahar:

I quit smoking in 1992. I had started to smoke at 15. From my late 20's for 10 years I tried to quit. I thought I was going to end up being one of those who took their oxygen tube out to take a drag of a cig.

I quit the day I stopped trying and just committed to quit. I promised myself I would never take even a drag. I used this prayer as often as I needed to, repeating it when necessary through the day, "Lord, remind me that nothing is going to happen to me today, that You and I together can't handle."

My husband died of a massive heart attack...he didn't want to quit. It is a decision just like any addiction. I had asked an ex alcoholic why some people are successful at quitting and others aren't...he said those that quit want to and those that don't choose not to. I agree with him because it was my decision in the end and of course with God's grace that He provides us with, that brought about the success not to smoke.

Offering you prayers.

Apr 20th 2013 new

(Quote) Jerry-730726 said: Bahar, good thread you have here.I smoked at least a pack a day for 10 years. For me....t...
(Quote) Jerry-730726 said:

Bahar, good thread you have here.

I smoked at least a pack a day for 10 years. For me....the daily ritual of waking up...coughing/wheezing and hacking up stuff every morning ( I know this is gross but I will make a point here) finally got to me. And I was short of breath. It was about this time I read Jim Fixx's book about "Running" that I thought wow.....how liberating! But knew I needed to quit smoking if I wanted to run. (course this was many pounds and many years ago! ha!)

So I started running gradually....and only for very short distances like half-a-mile. When I first started I HATED the cigs but kept smoking anyway...until on day I looked up and saw the 1st of the year was coming around. I prayed, ran...and prayed some more. I felt I could stop. Finally we were celebrating New Years' (though I'm not saying here WAIT until Jan 1st) I stopped. I gave my last un-opened pack to my neighbor who happened to smoke the same brand as me and said "Here Larry....I won't be needing these any more" He looked at me incredulously but nevertheless
respect. That was 30 years ago. Have run in many 5k's, 10k's and various distances including finishing 2 marathons. Now because of foot and back problems I walk. This prescription for quitting isn't for everyone except for these 3 things: 1) you should pray for God's help 2) You should REALLY....I mean REALLY REALLY WANT TO quit 3) Take it ONE DAY AT A TIME. (just quit every morning you wake up...don't look at next year, next month, or next week...or even tomorrow. Just quit EVERY DAY) Hope it helps~

--hide--


Jerry,

I feel your post is right-on. The two of us come from a generation where smoking was considered being social. Growing up, most of the men I knew smoked in some form, ie. cigarettes, cigars, pipe and some even chewed tobacco. Uhh!! When I was an altar boy, priests smoked, the doctors we went to smoked. I recall one priest I served Mass for in the 60s. This was pre-Vatican II and after Mass the priest and altar boys went to the sacristy. Before this priest took off his vestments, he would open the door that led from the sacristy outside, stand on the porch and light up. It was considered unladylike in my mother's generation for women to smoke. Those that did usually did so privately. Jerry, do you remember in the 50s when we could buy candy cigarettes from the store? The ones that had a pink or red painted tip at the end?

My mother never smoked but died at age 69 from heart related problems. My dad smoked for many years and quit 35 years before he died at age 90. Had a lifetime of eating fried foods and never had a documented chloresteral reading greater than 180. The doctor explained to me there was no way to figure him out medically. He just finally wore out. In fact, on his death certificate where the box indicates whether smoking was a contributing factor in his death, the box is checked no. That is for life insurance purposes.

I too was a smoker off and on for many years. Certainly, nothing good can come from it. The nicotine is so very addictive notwithstanding the second hand smoke to others.

Another point to ponder - a good % of the generation below us smoke or have smoked pot for many years. I would think for many of those they also smoke cigarettes but I can't say for sure. However, many pot smokers go to other illegal drugs. Of course, they are just ruining their health and killing themselves in a different way. ...........and then there are those who dip snuff (smokeless tobacco). Like Walt Garrison of the Cowboys use to say, "just a pinch between your cheek and gums". laughing So, Jerry the next time your date is carrying a cup and frequently putting it up to her lips, she just may have a pinch between her cheek and gums. laughing Nothing like dating a woman who dips snuff. Their kisses are probably not too tasty. laughing

I certainly don't condone those who do smoke but understand their plight. For Bahar and others wanting to quit, I offer the following which is my opinion only. Food will taste better and you will feel better overall. Until you convince yourself mentally you want to truly quit, nothing like e-cigarettes, patches, gum or so many of the other aids will work for most people. To me, you just substitute one bad habit with another. Same thing with trying to lose weight or any other bad habit. Mind over matter.

Many years ago, I read a report those living in New York City breath in from all residues from vehicles, public transportation and air pollution the equivalent of smoking two packs a day. I would think in today's times with the EPA standards and guidelines, that would no longer hold true. I do know that people who live around the chemical plants outside of Houston have much higher incident rates of cancer. That has been proven statistically year in and year out.

The government will never outlaw the tobacco industry. Too much of a cash-cow tax wise. So, we individually will need to put our best foot forward and say "no more" and encourage others to do the same.

That is just my two cents

Blessings always to you my friend to the north, Praying Praying Praying

Leon

Apr 20th 2013 new

(Quote) Leon-593843 said: Jerry,I feel your post is right-on. The two of us come from a generation where smo...
(Quote) Leon-593843 said:



Jerry,

I feel your post is right-on. The two of us come from a generation where smoking was considered being social. Growing up, most of the men I knew smoked in some form, ie. cigarettes, cigars, pipe and some even chewed tobacco. Uhh!! When I was an altar boy, priests smoked, the doctors we went to smoked. I recall one priest I served Mass for in the 60s. This was pre-Vatican II and after Mass the priest and altar boys went to the sacristy. Before this priest took off his vestments, he would open the door that led from the sacristy outside, stand on the porch and light up. It was considered unladylike in my mother's generation for women to smoke. Those that did usually did so privately. Jerry, do you remember in the 50s when we could buy candy cigarettes from the store? The ones that had a pink or red painted tip at the end?

My mother never smoked but died at age 69 from heart related problems. My dad smoked for many years and quit 35 years before he died at age 90. Had a lifetime of eating fried foods and never had a documented chloresteral reading greater than 180. The doctor explained to me there was no way to figure him out medically. He just finally wore out. In fact, on his death certificate where the box indicates whether smoking was a contributing factor in his death, the box is checked no. That is for life insurance purposes.

I too was a smoker off and on for many years. Certainly, nothing good can come from it. The nicotine is so very addictive notwithstanding the second hand smoke to others.

Another point to ponder - a good % of the generation below us smoke or have smoked pot for many years. I would think for many of those they also smoke cigarettes but I can't say for sure. However, many pot smokers go to other illegal drugs. Of course, they are just ruining their health and killing themselves in a different way. ...........and then there are those who dip snuff (smokeless tobacco). Like Walt Garrison of the Cowboys use to say, "just a pinch between your cheek and gums". So, Jerry the next time your date is carrying a cup and frequently putting it up to her lips, she just may have a pinch between her cheek and gums. Nothing like dating a woman who dips snuff. Their kisses are probably not too tasty.

I certainly don't condone those who do smoke but understand their plight. For Bahar and others wanting to quit, I offer the following which is my opinion only. Food will taste better and you will feel better overall. Until you convince yourself mentally you want to truly quit, nothing like e-cigarettes, patches, gum or so many of the other aids will work for most people. To me, you just substitute one bad habit with another. Same thing with trying to lose weight or any other bad habit. Mind over matter.

Many years ago, I read a report those living in New York City breath in from all residues from vehicles, public transportation and air pollution the equivalent of smoking two packs a day. I would think in today's times with the EPA standards and guidelines, that would no longer hold true. I do know that people who live around the chemical plants outside of Houston have much higher incident rates of cancer. That has been proven statistically year in and year out.

The government will never outlaw the tobacco industry. Too much of a cash-cow tax wise. So, we individually will need to put our best foot forward and say "no more" and encourage others to do the same.

That is just my

Blessings always to you my friend to the north,

Leon

--hide--
Leon.....laughing laughing I DO remember those candy ones! My sister and I used to buy those. Problem was we wanted the real thing. Back then commercials abounded with cigarette spots. And EVERYONE including us kids thought they were COOL. I remember watching my Dad smoke Camels' Chesterfields and later L&M's. I thought it was okay...because he was doing it! Not cool! (no pun intended) Oh....and I think Leon the only thing I want in my dates' cup is coffee or even tea! Maybe I should put in my profile..."No smokers or chewers"! Anyway Bahar, I'm sorry for getting off course in your thread....and it IS for the under 45 folks..so I wish you luck...and will be praying for you! j

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