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This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

Saint Peter's Square was created so that more people could be in the presence of the Pope and was named after Saint Peter, one of Jesus's apostles.
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Apr 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Marge-938695 said: Not often enough. Not often enough among men of my generation. Refreshingly, it...
(Quote) Marge-938695 said:

Not often enough.

Not often enough among men of my generation.

Refreshingly, it often seems to be alive and well among men 20-30 years old. OTOH, maybe it's because in their eyes I am the little old lady in Jerry's original story...

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Well I know "chivalry" is not as prevalent perhaps...but have to believe it still exists among all ages.... as the people above have attested. These young folks do give all of us hope though~

Apr 25th 2013 new

I always appreciate the "common" courtesies offered by men (sometimes by other women, too) especially since I began experiencing mobility problems--opening doors/holding a door open for me, picking up something I've dropped, etc. I really cannot understand the mentality of anyone -- especially women--discouraging or abraiding a man for being a gentleman. scratchchin I am always pleased & surprised wide eyed when a young man, especially one who appears to be kind of rough 'n tumble, shows that he has been taught manners. And I certainly applaud young moms like Kate who are teaching their very young sons these behaviors--they should be encouraged & not chided. rose clap


On Easter Sunday, the church was packed, of course. I saw a pew that seemed to have room for my grandson & me. A gentleman with whom we have talked briefly before was sitting there & he moved out to let us in. It turned out that the rest of the pew was being saved for another family's member who had not yet arrived. This gentleman, when he realized this, ended up standing at the back of church the entire time. I told my grandson to thank him profusely as we exited. I did, too! You get a Gold Star!

Apr 25th 2013 new

I think it comes down to how you were raised, something as simple as holding the door for someone becomes second nature. A simple act of kindness can go a long way.

Apr 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Carol-737878 said: I always appreciate the "common" courtesies offered by men (sometimes by other...
(Quote) Carol-737878 said:

I always appreciate the "common" courtesies offered by men (sometimes by other women, too) especially since I began experiencing mobility problems--opening doors/holding a door open for me, picking up something I've dropped, etc. I really cannot understand the mentality of anyone -- especially women--discouraging or abraiding a man for being a gentleman. I am always pleased & surprised when a young man, especially one who appears to be kind of rough 'n tumble, shows that he has been taught manners. And I certainly applaud young moms like Kate who are teaching their very young sons these behaviors--they should be encouraged & not chided.


On Easter Sunday, the church was packed, of course. I saw a pew that seemed to have room for my grandson & me. A gentleman with whom we have talked briefly before was sitting there & he moved out to let us in. It turned out that the rest of the pew was being saved for another family's member who had not yet arrived. This gentleman, when he realized this, ended up standing at the back of church the entire time. I told my grandson to thank him profusely as we exited. I did, too!

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Very good one Carol! At Christmas 2 years ago both my sons went with me to Mass. We were there just early enough to get decent seats. In walks a family of 4 just before Mass starts...and by now....NO more seats. So my younger son whispers...."Dad...look..they have two young kids, let's get up and let them have these" We did and stood in the back. (those young parents were extremely thankful...even turning us down at first...but my sons were insistent) Even though it was a bit tiring to stand there the whole time....I was proud of both of them~

Apr 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Dave-428254 said: I think it comes down to how you were raised, something as simple as holding the door for someone ...
(Quote) Dave-428254 said:

I think it comes down to how you were raised, something as simple as holding the door for someone becomes second nature. A simple act of kindness can go a long way.

--hide--
Sorry I missed this Dave. Thanks for posting. And you are correct. It is amazing at just how simple it (the act of kindness) can be. And I whole-heartedly agree with you about "how one is raised" (makes a difference)

Apr 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Robert-964870 said: Hmmm I believe that chivalry is not dead in your age group
(Quote) Robert-964870 said:

Hmmm I believe that chivalry is not dead in your age group

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Thanks for the reassurance! I'm so glad to know that I am wrong!!!!

wink thumbsup wave

Apr 25th 2013 new

To quote a famous comedian, "Chivalry is dead... and women killed it."


While most of us can cite specific examples of chivalry here and there, I would argue that, on the whole, it is a left-over remnant of a society that has basically ceased to exist for the past 40-50 odd years. Chivalrous acts by men (holding the door open, giving up a seat to a woman on the subway, etc.) signal that men and women occupy distinct places in society, and that men are the protectors and providers for women. Since the triumph of the feminist revolution and the entrance of women into the workplace as the equals of men (now, even on the front lines of battle), chivalrous gestures no longer make any sense in a world where men are not regarded by society as the protectors and providers for women.


I am a medical student who works in a hospital, and I can attest that if I went around opening doors for female doctors and nurses, many of them would regard that gesture with suspicion, even as insulting to them. I can't say I blame them-- medicine is very hierarchical, and for a student to imply through his actions that he is in some way above his superiors is a big no-no.


So it is very confusing for men to know when chivalry is appropriate in today's society-- when it will be appreciated, and when it may be met with confusion, contempt, and even hostitily.

Apr 25th 2013 new

Several months ago I was heading towards a Dunkin Donuts and a family was ahead of me, the littlest man of the family, holds the big ole heavy door for me and said, 'go ahead ma'am' ok, here in NJ we don't hear ma'am that often and I had to thank him profusely and loudly and thanked his mom for a job well done, I also told him, 'please don't ever change' he was adorable!

Apr 25th 2013 new

(Quote) David-629572 said: To quote a famous comedian, "Chivalry is dead... and women killed it." While...
(Quote) David-629572 said:

To quote a famous comedian, "Chivalry is dead... and women killed it."


While most of us can cite specific examples of chivalry here and there, I would argue that, on the whole, it is a left-over remnant of a society that has basically ceased to exist for the past 40-50 odd years. Chivalrous acts by men (holding the door open, giving up a seat to a woman on the subway, etc.) signal that men and women occupy distinct places in society, and that men are the protectors and providers for women. Since the triumph of the feminist revolution and the entrance of women into the workplace as the equals of men (now, even on the front lines of battle), chivalrous gestures no longer make any sense in a world where men are not regarded by society as the protectors and providers for women.


I am a medical student who works in a hospital, and I can attest that if I went around opening doors for female doctors and nurses, many of them would regard that gesture with suspicion, even as insulting to them. I can't say I blame them-- medicine is very hierarchical, and for a student to imply through his actions that he is in some way above his superiors is a big no-no.


So it is very confusing for men to know when chivalry is appropriate in today's society-- when it will be appreciated, and when it may be met with confusion, contempt, and even hostitily.

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David, interesting. Thanks for posting this. Maybe I'm old....but I'm NOT going to stop being courteous. (I don't care what the reaction is) Besides, as we have seen here....kindness seems to transcend all age groups~

Apr 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Jacqueline-198 said: Several months ago I was heading towards a Dunkin Donuts and a family was ahead of me, the litt...
(Quote) Jacqueline-198 said:

Several months ago I was heading towards a Dunkin Donuts and a family was ahead of me, the littlest man of the family, holds the big ole heavy door for me and said, 'go ahead ma'am' ok, here in NJ we don't hear ma'am that often and I had to thank him profusely and loudly and thanked his mom for a job well done, I also told him, 'please don't ever change' he was adorable!

--hide--
Bless his heart! Thanks Jacqueline!

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