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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people 45+. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

The story of Abraham and Sarah is told in chapters 11-25 of the book of Genesis.
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May 3rd 2013 new

(Quote) Lauren-927923 said: lol, I suppose a comma would have been helpful there
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said:

lol, I suppose a comma would have been helpful there

--hide--

- and maybe some re-ordering of the phrases, such as:

"To be honest, Lois, I think it is fairly common."

(I wouldn't have been able to do a thing with that.) smile smile

May 3rd 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: As Catholics -- members of the one, holy, catholic, apostolic Church -- we should be practicing the...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

As Catholics -- members of the one, holy, catholic, apostolic Church -- we should be practicing the message clearly given to us by Jesus: LOVE THY NEIGHBOR!!! Sadly, this is not the practice in all Churches, as you discovered. The warmth that one should feel in a Church just isn't always there for some reason. We're in Church to hear the Good Lord's message. It does not behoove people who seem to listen but fail to live up to expectations.

It does call to mind that we, as humans, do fail at least occasionally, and that's why there's a need for the Church. Ultimately we all have to answer for our shortcomings, which are our own -- nobody else's. There is some consolation in that.

As far as your first parish is concerned, it would have been helpful to notify them of your leaving so they would remove your name(s) from parish records. Most people don't do this, so I'm not picking on you. It's just that I've seen some of the internal workings for Church's to keep membership records up-to-date. But....no real harm done in the end so you shouldn't lose sleep over it.

I am glad you found a parish where you experienced a welcoming atmosphere. That is as it should be.

--hide--


Thanks Ray, I agree we are all human and each one of us is accountable before God. I was expressing how it feels not to be included, especially being migrants in a new country with no support whatsoever. We came from a country where church and our faith meant everything for us. The main reason we migrated was when we felt threatened due to our faith. I wrote this in response to some people negating the importance of community in building our faith. I tend to disagree. Much as I pray on my own and try my best to be a good Catholic, there were times in my life when my community of Christians held me. I am forever grateful to them.

Concerning informing the parish that we had left, we did inform inform the parish office that we were leaving. That is why we were so taken aback by the letter. We did call and have a talk with the parish priest about all this, so that this would not happen again.




May 3rd 2013 new
(Quote) Joanne-846477 said: My parish priest told us he likes to see people visiting/chatting after Mass. He feels it is a sign of commun...
(Quote) Joanne-846477 said:

My parish priest told us he likes to see people visiting/chatting after Mass. He feels it is a sign of community. I also see a small number of people staying to pray even while there is visiting going on.

My church's open design doesn't lend itself to silence very well. The sound from the lobby carries up over the choirloft into the sanctuary. I suppose if one wants to pray in silence one can wait until all the people leave. It usually doesn't take too long for the people to leave anyway.

--hide--


I supposes this is visiting in the foyer or narthex, instead of in the temple area proper?
May 3rd 2013 new

(Quote) Maria-964923 said: I am in agreement with Pauline that fellowship is just as important. As an Army wife for 20 years and mo...
(Quote) Maria-964923 said: I am in agreement with Pauline that fellowship is just as important. As an Army wife for 20 years and moving every 2-4 years, my faith grew ever stronger when we lived in Germany and hopping in the car to drive to visit family was not an option. So we found fellowship and support from our church family, some of whom became very dear,close and lifelong friends and godparents to our children. Our lives revolved around parish activities because that's where our friends were, my children have always felt at home in our church. Since we changed church locations frequently I stressed the importance that they their faith is not based on the building or the few people that may appear standoffish because they don't greet us, it is the love of our God they carry in their heart which is what keeps them warm and radiates to others. I found the fellowship we shared before and after mass also provided for my children a sort of guideline on making friends with likeminded people, not in a condescending way but a more discerning way.
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Thank you Maria, I too have had the same experience. After migrating to Australia, we had no family close to where we lived. Our family was our new church. For 2 years till we found this new church, we struggled. We went for mass, prayed and remained faithful. We made other friends but as they were not Catholics, we missed on fellowship. We did not know where to go for fellowship. I am now again in a church where the priest is able to break the word of God, we receive the sacraments and we fellowship. I think we need to do all within our capacity as individuals to create the sense of fellowship and warmth in our churches. That is our mission. And it is this along with prayer and intercession that will bring people back to our churches.

God Bless

May 3rd 2013 new
(Quote) Ray-566531 said: Yes, and I'm sure many others (probably most) have experienced the same. The main purpose of g...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Yes, and I'm sure many others (probably most) have experienced the same.



The main purpose of going to Mass is to participate in it, and, if able, to receive the Eucharist. By participating, I'm including listening to the prayers and readings, the homily, and being vocal in the responses and singing of hymns. To this end, it makes no difference if the people around you seem aloof, or the priest isn't enthusiastic.



But....in selecting a parish to call "home", there is something more inviting when the people are warm and friendly, and open to greeting one another -- someone known or a visitor. The warmth can be felt. The priest can be "inviting" by showing pleasure to be presiding at the Mass. Someone (usually ushers) to say "Hello" on the way in, and some form of farewell upon leaving adds to it.



While we don't go to Mass to be entertained or become engaged socially, some displays of welcoming certainly are a plus and can add to one's enthusiasm about attending Mass there.



But let's put the shoe on the other foot. Is there a reason why we ourselves can't initiate signs of friendship, taking steps to promote this feeling? What if we would greet an usher first? What if we extended our hands toward those around us during the sign of peace? What if we actually said "Hello" to those nearby before the Mass begins? We rely upon others to do what we want, but aren't always inclined to start the ball rolling. Complaining is a negative reaction. Isn't there a more positive way for us to follow ourselves?



Careful with that -- it could be contagious.

--hide--


I'm sorry, but this thing of having to say "hello" to my fellow worshippers, when I have already sat myself down for divine worship and prepare myself for the Eucharist, is precisely what I don't like about many parishes today. You can do that in the narthex. Speaking for myself, it is hard enough to keep myself focused during the Mass itself. Unnecessary banter before the Mass starts makes it all the more challenging.
May 3rd 2013 new

(Quote) Kevin-40666 said: - and maybe some re-ordering of the phrases, such as: "To be honest,...
(Quote) Kevin-40666 said:

- and maybe some re-ordering of the phrases, such as:

"To be honest, Lois, I think it is fairly common."

(I wouldn't have been able to do a thing with that.)

--hide--

But, Kevin, what would have been the fun in the new reordering? smile

May 3rd 2013 new

In Maine we had a church that could fit 1000 people in a town of 150 population. Each stone was 3' length by 2' tall. There were spires and a bell and an organ in St. anthonys, inthe forest. about 2 years ago the old church got torn down and the new church got built on the bottom of our bad town. The new feels like a donut shop. I dont like donuts and this new church also doesnt feel right. What kind of scam is this I ask? Is it ok if I just stay home and watch church on tv????

maineanencyclopedia.com



May 3rd 2013 new

(Quote) Ellen-813688 said: I agree. For me, the most important part of the Mass is the Eucharist. I don't care what the ...
(Quote) Ellen-813688 said:

I agree. For me, the most important part of the Mass is the Eucharist. I don't care what the priest looks like or who talks to me. I don't even care if the Mass is in English. I can read the Gospel on my own and seek out homilies and discussions among friends and family ( including nuns and priests in my family) and literature. I am just joyful to receive the Eucharist. Period.

I know that fellowship is very important in strengthening our faith. We can seek this outside of the Mass. Bible study, volunteering in the church and Catholic charities and Christian charities, etc. are other venues to share our values and beliefs. I'm fortunate that all of my closest friends are Catholic, just bery iy chance, or maybe by God's design. I don't feel the need to socialize too much at church.

Just my point of view on the topic.

--hide--


Ellen, I agree with your sentiment. While community and fellowship are very important in the church, we shouldn't have to take over the Mass to practice these things. There should be plenty of other opportunities and venues to build community other than during Mass.

May 3rd 2013 new
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said: (Quote) Kevin-40666 said: - and maybe some re-ordering of the phrases...
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said:

Quote:
Kevin-40666 said:

- and maybe some re-ordering of the phrases, such as:

"To be honest, Lois, I think it is fairly common."

(I wouldn't have been able to do a thing with that.)


But, Kevin, what would have been the fun in the new reordering?

--hide--
It would have been no fun whatsoever, Lauren. I like your phrasing much better.
May 4th 2013 new

(Quote) Richard-15378 said: With my church slated to close in December, this is one of my greatest fears ... that I won'...
(Quote) Richard-15378 said:

With my church slated to close in December, this is one of my greatest fears ... that I won't be able to find a church where I feel comfortable .... It has me wondering if i will even continue to go to Mass after my church is gone .. I never thought I would ever think this way, but it is happening ...

--hide--
Despite the fact that for many, our human nature is reluctant to change; although change is obviously inevitable. We grow older -- no reversing that. But, in the process, we can become more mature and learn from our past -- both the good and the bad. We build on the good, and put the "bad" behind us by refraining from repeating history, and if it is a matter of a lapse of faith, receiving reconciliation. This gives us a fresh start -- wipes the slate clean, so to speak.

Thinking about discontinuing Mass attendance because of a Church closing sounds like an excuse not to attend. If a Church loses a beloved pastor, does that justify people not attending Mass because they no longer have their favorite priest on hand? Of course not. If we have a solid faith, we continue in the same manner -- "to love and serve the Lord", as the Mass dismissal reads. This is true no matter if Mass is at a new Church, an old one, or a makeshift one on a battlefield. My own recollection is that the hood of an Army Jeep was used as an altar when necessary. Did this diminish the reverence? Of course not -- actually it seemed to add to it.

Perhaps being too comfortable can lead to compacency and maintaining the status quo. A fresh start can renew our spirit, and help us become "alive" again.

If a person's faith is strong enough, a Church closing will not affect one's devotion to his/her Faith and adherence to it. To merely fall away because of it is a cop-out.

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