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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
Learn More: Saint Augustine

Jun 03 new
(quote) John-336509 said: I worked on an ambulance for over 8 years. There is no way to "adjust" a work schedule for an ambulance crew that will guarantee being off at a given time. Emergencies happen when they happen, and they take as long as they take. I made it to Mass as often as I could, but I still couldn't hit every Sunday.
Man isn't made to serve the law, but the law is made to serve man. Obviously for some good reason, the precept to hear Mass and rest from servile labor on Sundays and Holy Days can be set aside. What I think Andrew is saying is that people who profess to be Catholic ought not fall into tepidity regarding the observance of the precepts of the Church. In absence of a good reason otherwise, we must obey them. It's not whims or desires which excuse observance/obedience, but actual good reason.

It is not the same to schedule servile work on Sunday or a Holy Day, as responding to an emergency as an EMS/EMT.
Jun 03 new
I go to church on Sundays at St Gabriel's in Saddle River NJ...unless I have a running race or sailing on Sunday, then I go Mass on Saturday..../)/)....../)..../).
stgabrielsr.org
Jun 03 new
Fr. Ross, who was my pastor for a long time and also my boss and friend, suggested at one time that with the way the world was scheduled today, he would far rather have someone come to Mass on another weekday than not at all. That the important part in his opinion was to make that time to spend in worship with Our Lord and to receive the Eucharist. When someone was unable to make Mass he counseled them to make the effort to find another day during the week when it was more feasible for them. That is of course if there was a serious need to do so, not just because they didn't feel like going.
Jun 03 new
(quote) Paul-866591 said: Idolatry is giving adoration to anyone or anything other than God Himself.

So just believing that it is alright to miss Mass on Sunday is not idolatry.

What would be idolatry is if you say it is more important to watch Sunday's football game. In that instance you are giving adoration to something, the football game, that belongs to God alone. The idolatry is not the beleiving that one can miss Mass, but the adoration you would be giving to the game.

Just believing that one can miss Mass on Sunday is the sin of not keeping the Lord's Day, a serious act of impiety but not idolatry.
Bingo. I was holding off in hopes someone else would reply.
Jun 03 new
(quote) Lauren-927923 said: That is of course if there was a serious need to do so, not just because they didn't feel like going.
The question is what constitutes a serious need? For instance, is carting kids off to sports events on Sunday a serious need? I would say no: if sports conflict with Mass, there is a simple solution -- give up the sports.

Jun 03 new
Even emergency workers, however, should not be scheduled to be on call in such a way that they routinely must miss Sunday Mass. Given that the Sunday obligation can be fulfilled from Saturday evening to Sunday evening, it is not at all unreasonable for a worker to expect to have an hour and a half or so of availablity sometime between 4 PM Saturday and 7 PM Sunday, more than a 24-hour period. If a worker is not given that opportunity, it is an injustice that should be corrected. Again, sometimes, it doesn't work out. Sometimes, a scheduled worker is sick and another must substitute. Sometimes, an unusual emergency upsets the applecart on occasion, like the wildfires in Colorado last summer, where it essentially becomes all hands on deck until it's over. But every week or even every other week can't be a new crisis. If that happens, something is wrong. What I am saying is that Catholics must go out of their way if necessary to do something that is as good for them as food or water. Other workers, even non-Catholics, should be willing to assist their fellow workers to attend Sunday Mass out of respect and decency. No one should have to be scheduled to work both Saturday and Sunday in any occupation or job or whatever such that the person is given no opportunity to attend Sunday Mass. And regardless of what great things one is doing, missing Sunday Mass is bad for one's soul. Even Jesus went off by himself to pray, because it was necessary for his own soul. Even one is battling fires or doing open-heart surgery has to tend to his basic needs. I wouldn't want a surgeon cutting me open if he hadn't eaten in weeks, no matter how great he was or how great his intentions were. A person who does not take care of his spiritual needs-- for whatever reason-- is placing himself in spiritual danger, just as it does not matter why someone who hasn't eaten in three weeks does so-- he places himself in physical danger.
Jun 03 new
The question is what constitutes a serious need? For instance, is carting kids off to sports events on Sunday a serious need? I would say no: if sports conflict with Mass, there is a simple solution -- give up the sports.

Agreed, Jerry. When the kids were involved in Catholic Athletic Association, nothing could be scheduled after five on Saturdays nor before one on Sundays so as to not interfere. When participating in secular sports it can be a little trickier but not undoable. I have taken my kids to mass out of town, driven to an early mass in another town, and sometimes kept them from participating until after Mass. They survive. I can remember the stunned look I got from the teens I taught when we talked about this and they were like but we are out of town, so I gave them all a card with the number of Mass times all across the US, then they had no excuse lol.
Jun 03 new
(quote) Andrew-290721 said: Even emergency workers, however, should not be scheduled to be on call in such a way that they routinely must miss Sunday Mass. Given that the Sunday obligation can be fulfilled from Saturday evening to Sunday evening, it is not at all unreasonable for a worker to expect to have an hour and a half or so of availablity sometime between 4 PM Saturday and 7 PM Sunday, more than a 24-hour period. If a worker is not given that opportunity, it is an injustice that should be corrected. Again, sometimes, it doesn't work out. Sometimes, a scheduled worker is sick and another must substitute. Sometimes, an unusual emergency upsets the applecart on occasion, like the wildfires in Colorado last summer, where it essentially becomes all hands on deck until it's over. But every week or even every other week can't be a new crisis. If that happens, something is wrong. What I am saying is that Catholics must go out of their way if necessary to do something that is as good for them as food or water. Other workers, even non-Catholics, should be willing to assist their fellow workers to attend Sunday Mass out of respect and decency. No one should have to be scheduled to work both Saturday and Sunday in any occupation or job or whatever such that the person is given no opportunity to attend Sunday Mass. And regardless of what great things one is doing, missing Sunday Mass is bad for one's soul. Even Jesus went off by himself to pray, because it was necessary for his own soul. Even one is battling fires or doing open-heart surgery has to tend to his basic needs. I wouldn't want a surgeon cutting me open if he hadn't eaten in weeks, no matter how great he was or how great his intentions were. A person who does not take care of his spiritual needs-- for whatever reason-- is placing himself in spiritual danger, just as it does not matter why someone who hasn't eaten in three weeks does so-- he places himself in physical danger.
Good stuff here.

If you're smart enough to be in a medical job such as EMT, you should also have the foresight to make a point of knowing the service times of various parishes close to home and closer to wherever you're stationed at work. Doing this shows that you're making every effort to at least know the "emergency exits" as it were. Extenuating circumstances exist, but they aren't really extenuating circumstances if they are every other week, as Andrew said so aptly.

As for the "Priesthood of all Believers", a true doctrine that is misunderstood by Protestants, this means that you have a job already as [non-sacerdotal] priest. And that job is to participate in liturgy by being present and involved at Mass. This supercedes any other job you have and nothing else may conventionally take precedence over it. Ever.
Jun 03 new
(quote) Gary-936836 said: Good stuff here.

If you're smart enough to be in a medical job such as EMT, you should also have the foresight to make a point of knowing the service times of various parishes close to home and closer to wherever you're stationed at work. Doing this shows that you're making every effort to at least know the "emergency exits" as it were. Extenuating circumstances exist, but they aren't really extenuating circumstances if they are every other week, as Andrew said so aptly.

As for the "Priesthood of all Believers", a true doctrine that is misunderstood by Protestants, this means that you have a job already as [non-sacerdotal] priest. And that job is to participate in liturgy by being present and involved at Mass. This supercedes any other job you have and nothing else may conventionally take precedence over it. Ever.
Right! Because rural America doesn't exist, it's all a question of being smart! Nowhere in the U.S. does there exist a county with only a single parish that only has a couple of Masses. ..
Jun 03 new
(quote) Lauren-927923 said: so I gave them all a card with the number of Mass times all across the US, then they had no excuse lol.
I tried to give you a thumbs-up, but it's not working.

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