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A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

Saint Peter's Square was created so that more people could be in the presence of the Pope and was named after Saint Peter, one of Jesus's apostles.
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Jun 12th 2013 new
This week, I'm emptying out my shop space, in the building my Dad bought some 30+ years ago to expand his business and support the family. Dad shut the business down a couple years ago, not too long after Mom died and he remarried. Now the building's been sold and an era is truly ending. At least in my little world. It's crazy, but it seems that every square inch of the place is a life lesson. Can't say that I learned the lessons quickly or easily. Or that today I can really live up to the example. But, Dad chose his own path and followed it doggedly. Even when the odds were stacked against him.
I'm fortunate to have had two living grandfathers through most of my life. One a one time vaudeville dancer, clarinet player, and aircraft manufacturing engineer. He finished high school at sixteen and went off to college. But he had to leave after the crash in '29. Worked odd jobs throughout the depression. Told stories about getting held up at gunpoint by folks even more desperate, or less willing to work than him. He liked his martinis dry. "Just wave the vermouth over the glass..." The other, first generation, American born Irish with a sparkle in his eye. Lost his dad in a rail yard accident when he was only seven or eight. He pursued my grandmother even after her Polish father said "no way". Her family ultimately adopted him as if he were one of their own. He told me stories about his father in law as if he were his own dad.
Among the things I'm packing up this week are another great grandfather's hand planes, bits, and brace. There's a lot of history, a lot of fathers... Imagine a bit of Thoreau, Mark Twain, St. Patrick, St. Joseph and more, shaken, not stirred, there's my collective Dads.

Jun 13th 2013 new
(quote) John-132457 said: This week, I'm emptying out my shop space, in the building my Dad bought some 30+ years ago to expand his business and support the family. Dad shut the business down a couple years ago, not too long after Mom died and he remarried. Now the building's been sold and an era is truly ending. At least in my little world. It's crazy, but it seems that every square inch of the place is a life lesson. Can't say that I learned the lessons quickly or easily. Or that today I can really live up to the example. But, Dad chose his own path and followed it doggedly. Even when the odds were stacked against him.
I'm fortunate to have had two living grandfathers through most of my life. One a one time vaudeville dancer, clarinet player, and aircraft manufacturing engineer. He finished high school at sixteen and went off to college. But he had to leave after the crash in '29. Worked odd jobs throughout the depression. Told stories about getting held up at gunpoint by folks even more desperate, or less willing to work than him. He liked his martinis dry. "Just wave the vermouth over the glass..." The other, first generation, American born Irish with a sparkle in his eye. Lost his dad in a rail yard accident when he was only seven or eight. He pursued my grandmother even after her Polish father said "no way". Her family ultimately adopted him as if he were one of their own. He told me stories about his father in law as if he were his own dad.
Among the things I'm packing up this week are another great grandfather's hand planes, bits, and brace. There's a lot of history, a lot of fathers... Imagine a bit of Thoreau, Mark Twain, St. Patrick, St. Joseph and more, shaken, not stirred, there's my collective Dads.

My word! John your story is so touching. Thank you for sharing all of these touching remembrances so eloquently.
I am truly amazed at ALL the stories in here. I just Cmers come from good stock!
Jun 13th 2013 new
correction: I just KNEW CMers come from good stock!
Jun 13th 2013 new
(quote) Rosemarie-744159 said: HAPPY FATHER'S DAY to you, Jerry!!! and to all CM Dads!

My Dad will always be my hero!
Thank you so much Rosemarie! I think all the dads in here are special. There are those friends I know who are VERY special!
I once went back to the "assisted living" facility where my Father lived in his last year. His friends and I had lunch. They of course spoke fondly of my Dad. "Complete gentleman" was just one of the adjectives offered that day. I told his old friends, "If I could be 25 per cent of the person my Dad was I would be a much better man for it"
I am lucky to have had the Father I had. And if I am ever down I always feel better after "hugging" the flag~


Jun 13th 2013 new
Thank you Jerry so much for this topic.

I have a tough time each year around Father's day because I miss my dad so much.
His name was Franjo (Francis). He was a man of prayer, a devout Catholic, a leader, protector of his family, a farmer, an honest, trustworthy and hardworking man.
My father was a true Catholic who lived his faith, walked his faith, and died in his faith.
I lost him a long time ago but it feels like it was yesterday. There are so many things I wish I could have told my father. The pain that I feel sometimes is unbearable still after so many years. I miss the sound of his voice and laughter. I also miss the talks we used to have and the advice he used to give me.
When I was growing up in a small village in Croatia, we had to go to daily mass. We would pray before and after meals. Evening prayer was so long I would fall asleep most of the time. My father was always leading the prayer. During the day, when the church bell sounded off at noon time to remind people to pray, my father would go down on his knees and pray "The Angelus." Anyone around him at that time would follow along.
My sister and I used to go with my father to the field where he was working. We would try to help him, but we would always end up playing hide and seek in the corn field. On the way to the field we would meet neighbors and my father would stop for a little chat. They would always tell my father how much I looked like him. He would just smile and pat me on my head. I was so proud of that.
My parents loved each other very much. There was a gaze between my parents I did not understand as a child. Now, I know the meaning of that gaze. A sacramental and sacred marital bond between man and woman and at the center of their marriage was God.
While my dad was dying surrounded by his wife, children and close family, we asked him what we could do to ease his suffering. His eyes would be closed and he would tell us to pray. After a while, he would open up his eyes and look up towards the crucifix on the wall and say, "Only He will help me." I remember him pointing at the crucified Lord and those being his last words.
I loved, admired and respected my father so much. He was my hero. I have never met a man like him since.
Just by how he lived his life and what kind of man he was, I see my Dad was like a saint.
Dad I miss you very much and will continue to love you forever!

Jun 13th 2013 new
I remember how thoughtful and even tender my Dad could be. One time, our family dog was run over right in front of our house. (she did live but had a broken shoulder and lots of road rash) I can remember him looking right into my eyes and watching/studying my sadness (I had witnessed the whole incident) He said, "Jer, miraculously "Lady" is going to be okay....don't worry" She had a hard time dealing with the pain...but mostly whimpered at night while recovering. It was always "lights out" by a certain time (especially school nights) so we weren't allowed to get up. I noticed the whimpering had stopped and fell asleep one night. The next morning she was sleeping with a better, warmer blanket. My Mom had told me Dad had gotten up....and "held" her for awhile and before putting her down had found a blanket she liked. (never forgotten this)
Jun 13th 2013 new
What a wonderful tribute! Thank you so much Kate. Don't worry....he is indeed still with you!
Jun 13th 2013 new
All of your posts are wonderful. I'm missing my father. Our family has been rocked by his absence, struggling to find the equilibrium that was shaken upon his passing. I realize that we must carry on those qualities we so admired in him and to be the anchors for our individual families. In word and in deed and in the quiet gestures of kindness and compassion, he taught us about God and faith and love and family and hope.. I'll strive to do the same for my family.
Jun 13th 2013 new
Thank you Christie....and welcome to the forums!
I still miss mine but try to think of this scenario (its crazy but it helps me anyway). I ask myself a question: If given the opportunity....would Dad rejoin us (come back) NOW? The answer of course is always is.. NO. He is living in perfect happiness
Jun 13th 2013 new
Like many others, I too miss my father every day. He passed away in my arms in Sept 07 of a massive heart attack.

He was my hero - which is how many girls (of all ages) view their fathers. They are our first and usually finest example of what a good faith-filled husband, father, sibling, uncle, family member and friend should be. He was well-liked by everyone, led by example (not only by word, although he was an excellent speaker), and showed our family every day how much he loved us. He was a Christian in everything he did, especially in his business dealings - he refused to get into the 'buy their business under the table' games. He worked hard to support his wife and 5 kids - he took 12 years to complete his college degree via night classes. He didn't compare himself to others - nor did he judge others - he just tried to be the best version of himself every day.

His kindness and generosity was constant, yet most of the time it was unknown to others. I can't count how many "did you ever know that he helped me with xxxxxx" stories I heard after he died - things I never knew before. He would do anything to lift another person up - lend a hand, give money, send flowers or give a gift just because he saw it and thought the recipient would appreciate it. He never expected anything in return - he was simply being a kind man. He had the gift of seeing a need before it was apparent to others - and he would try to find a way to improve the situation - even if it was with a simple gesture.

I still feel him helping me with figuring out what to do in various situations, I still feel him watching over me. He taught me to live my life thinking of others, to always find the positive, the silver lining in every situation - and to cherish every day, every moment with friends and loved ones - because we never really know if it will be our last encounter with them. While I'm truly happy he is in his eternal home, I miss being his Princess.

May God bless all fathers this Father's Day - those still with us and those watching over us from Heaven.

(GREAT thread, Jerry. Everyone has such wonderful stories and memories - thank you to ALL for sharing.)
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