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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Jul 15th 2013 new
(quote) Sheila-953093 said: I was a fallen away/returned after 20 years Catholic and I made an appointment! Yes, it did take more than 30 minutes and I suspected it would, which is why I chose to make an appointment. It's very scarey to return but it is not a routine-Saturday-confession experience and should not be done as a 'slip-in-on-Saturday-during-regular-confessions' basis. Different strokes for different folks but routine confession time is not the time or place to return...it's rude!
I respectfully disagree.

There is no doubt that making an appointment makes a lot of sense.

But the time to return is when the soul is impelled to do so. A "strike while the iron is hot" moment.

For many, if they don't move immediately when the impulse to come back hits them, the delay could be deadly to the impulse.

Satan having had a hold for a long time, is not going to surrender a soul who is abandoning him without a fight. A person away for a long time, does not necessarily have the moral strength to resist an all out attack by the devil.


Jul 15th 2013 new
(quote) Paul-866591 said: I respectfully disagree.

There is no doubt that making an appointment makes a lot of sense.

But the time to return is when the soul is impelled to do so. A "strike while the iron is hot" moment.

For many, if they don't move immediately when the impulse to come back hits them, the delay could be deadly to the impulse.

Satan having had a hold for a long time, is not going to surrender a soul who is abandoning him without a fight. A person away for a long time, does not necessarily have the moral strength to resist an all out attack by the devil.


Paul, what would be the difference between going to a Reconciliation appointment on a Saturday during the 4-5PM Penance schedule and making a private appointment for any other day?? A body still has to wait while Satan continues to hang on!

Believe it or not my first 'impulse' came during Holy Week 1993 and I called the rectory for an appointment and was told, by the pastor no less, that the priests were quite busy so please try again later! Then I was given the times for confession during that Holy Week. I asked for, and received, an appointment for the Tuesday immediately following Easter 1993 at 9:00AM.

You're correct about Satan and his unwillingness to surrender a soul without a fight. In my case he got the ear of my pastor as a tool to try to bully me away from a return to Catholicism!! Somebody wanted me back more than Satan could fight and He won!!! angel
Jul 15th 2013 new
(quote) Paul-866591 said: I respectfully disagree.

There is no doubt that making an appointment makes a lot of sense.

But the time to return is when the soul is impelled to do so. A "strike while the iron is hot" moment.

For many, if they don't move immediately when the impulse to come back hits them, the delay could be deadly to the impulse.

Satan having had a hold for a long time, is not going to surrender a soul who is abandoning him without a fight. A person away for a long time, does not necessarily have the moral strength to resist an all out attack by the devil.


Exactly!

And I would surmise this is precisely why so many just put it off and put it off, until Christmas, Easter or longer! Excellent points, Paul!

I think confession on at least a monthly basis is good for the soul. And if a person thinks that is ridiculously frequent, then I would love to meet the SAINTLY one to learn more from one living a perfect life example.

Uh, if more Catholics went to monthly confessions, we sure would need more than a half hour to an hour window on Saturdays, that most parishes allocate to it... even if the average confession lasted just 5 minutes ( a rate of 12 confessions per hour per priest hearing them).

Hmm, let's do a little simple math. So, in a parish of let's say a 1,000 members... let's say 80% are over the age of 10, thus 800. Now at 5 minutes a confession that would require 800/12=66.7 hours. And thus, it requires more time that the priests allow for confession for a whole year (52 weeks per year folks at an hour per weekend!) just to hear the entire parish member's confession ONCE in the year.

Now imagine the time problem if everyone went once a month!!! That parish would need 15 priests to get it done in the one hour a week parishes currently schedule.

FOLKS, PRACTICALLY NO ONE GOES TO CONFESSION!!! And now we know why the Church is in the state it's in form yet another perspective.

Just simple math folks. Numbers don't lie.

I would submit that most people go to communion (receive the Eucharist) in a state of mortal sin.

Mary weeps for her son!
Jul 15th 2013 new
(quote) Sheila-953093 said: Believe it or not my first 'impulse' came during Holy Week 1993 and I called the rectory for an appointment and was told, by the pastor no less, that the priests were quite busy so please try again later! 


sic

Of course the priests are busy that time of year... thus their unavailability when most are likely to seek it... at CHRISTMAS and EASTER... and the problem is amplified. The devil is clever!

I would venture that less than 10% of Catholics who go to regular Mass go to confession more than once a year. The vast majority don't go at all! All I need is the example of my own parish to know this to be typical. But the line for communion is long. I almost never see a person stay in the pew during regular Masses on Sundays.

Mary weeps more tears!
Jul 15th 2013 new
I might add that this (confession) is one service that only a priest can provide. Therefore, it should be one of the very top items on his list of priorities. Some administration duties of the parish, and some other tasks can be handled by lay persons, if necessary. I agree with you that the priest should keep at it until the line empties. I'm sure that Satan would really enjoy it if 5 or 10 people were sent away without being able to confess their sins that day. Accomodations can be made the next week to relieve the priest with another, if necessary.

Ed
Jul 15th 2013 new
+1 Ed
Jul 15th 2013 new
(quote) John-971967 said: sic

Of course the priests are busy that time of year... thus their unavailability when most are likely to seek it... at CHRISTMAS and EASTER... and the problem is amplified. The devil is clever!

I would venture that less than 10% of Catholics who go to regular Mass go to confession more than once a year. The vast majority don't go at all! All I need is the example of my own parish to know this to be typical. But the line for communion is long. I almost never see a person stay in the pew during regular Masses on Sundays.

Mary weeps more tears!
Actually, I had a glorified and dramatic prodigal daughter mentality when I returned to the Church. Boy did I get a smack in the chops!! Pride still goeth before a fall! I called the rectory because I felt it would be more polite of me not to crowd out somebody who was a regular Saturday penitent and who might have the misfortune to get behind me!! Wasn't their fault that I totally disappeared for 20 years! I still think my way...when someone has my circumstances...is the most appropriate way to proceed.

You are so correct about the lengths of confession lines vs. the communion lines! I try not to judge but sometimes I wonder. Then when I have to climb over somebody I really wonder what they did that they can't go, too!! Shame on them.... tongue angel
Jul 15th 2013 new
(quote) Sheila-953093 said: Actually, I had a glorified and dramatic prodigal daughter mentality when I returned to the Church. Boy did I get a smack in the chops!! Pride still goeth before a fall! I called the rectory because I felt it would be more polite of me not to crowd out somebody who was a regular Saturday penitent and who might have the misfortune to get behind me!! Wasn't their fault that I totally disappeared for 20 years! I still think my way...when someone has my circumstances...is the most appropriate way to proceed.

You are so correct about the lengths of confession lines vs. the communion lines! I try not to judge but sometimes I wonder. Then when I have to climb over somebody I really wonder what they did that they can't go, too!! Shame on them....
I would like to be clear.

I applaud you for making the effort to think of your fellow penitents by making an appointment so has not to inconvenience the limited time for normal confessions. And if a returning soul has the will power to, as in your case, be put off for such a relatively long time, more power to them.

This is a true story.

Imagine someone away from the Church for a long time 30+ years. Lying in a hospital bed with the chances of survival less than 25% and begging for a priest and none showing up. In a virtual state of despair of utter despair as they are wheeled into the Operating room.

In the operating room, the surgeons made the two required small incisions for the laparoscopic surgery.They then inserted the camera. As they explored the area the first words out of the Chief Surgeons mouth was, "How is this guy alive." The second question was, Can we save him?" As an aside, at this point the laparoscoptic surgery had to be abandoned.An 8 inch incision had to be used and it was still an iffy process.

Later recovering from a virtual miracle surgery, the patient again asked for a priest and non appeared. When he was discharged he left the hospital in utter despair and fatalistically believing that although God had spared him, he was still abandoned and condemned with no possibility of being set right.

So he went on with his life with this darkness of soul. A little more than 3 years went by like this. Then a very dear friend was diagnosed with cancer which ultimately led to her death after 14 months of battling. When she was diagnosed, it added to several bits of very bad news he received, that his own Doctor had to put him on anti-depression medication.

As he wallowed in his despair for himself and his friend, he realized that all he could do for his friend was to pray, That he did, but then he became convinced that since he was so mired in sin no one was listening to his prayers. And that is what finally did the trick that got him back to the Church.

Now would anyone deny him the right to go to confession immediately even if doing so meant he was going to tie up the priest for close to an hour?

No right or wrong answer here, just food for thought.
Aug 26th 2013 new
Yes, I have. It only served to make me more patient and adamant that I would not leave until I was confessed or sent away. Ignatian discernment would have you remain and refuse to become perturbed by it. Or if unable to not become perturbed, to persist in your resolve to confess. If you were merely confessing mortal sins, however, and you were pressed for time, it would not be as crucial an issue.
Aug 26th 2013 new
(quote) David-364112 said: The woman who pushed me aside, and probably the homeless man described in the topic post were most likely mentally ill. I doubt very much that their behavior could be modified by remonstration.

The man in the wheelchair was probably angry and resentful at his situation and feels pushed aside all too often in his daily life, so he cuts to the front and demands special attention from God whom he probably feels caused him to be wheelchair-bound.

Scolding any of them would simply drive them further from Christ. By their behavior they NEED Christ and want him badly. If that means we step out of the way then so be it.

There are times and situations where it's appropriate the admonish somebody, but those are few and far between. We can't let ourselves suffer abuse or to be doormats, but neither should we be scolds. Nobody likes a pious scold. ABSOLUTELY NOBODY. Those are the people who drive more wavering souls out of the church and into the arms of the enemy than anything else.

Finally, perhaps the people who needed to learn a lesson from these situations outside the confessional are not the offenders but the offended. Everything that happens in our lives can be an invitation to holiness.

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/ugolino/flowers.iii.viii.html Read the last 15 or 20 lines carefully.

Well David....
It certainly seems like you received a great grace of understanding and ccompassion from our Lord (over your situation).
That is so awesome your heart softened for another. :)
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