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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
Learn More: Saint Augustine

Aug 27th 2013 new
(quote) Julie-362086 said: Well David....
It certainly seems like you received a great grace of understanding and ccompassion from our Lord (over your situation).
That is so awesome your heart softened for another. :)
Thanks. I'm no saint, but I'm vividly aware of how much has been forgiven me. Not that my past sins are all that bad - most of them are comparatively mundane and trivial - pebbles instead of boulders. But a ton of pebbles is still a ton. God has forgiven so much of what I've done or failed to do, how can I be upset with the faults of others?

Apart from the Apostle John, the one person in all of scripture for whom I have the greatest empathy is this woman. Read the story and Jesus's response:

Now there was a sinful woman in the city who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee. Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment, she stood behind him at his feet weeping and began to bathe his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment. When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself, "If this man were a prophet, he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him, that she is a sinner." Jesus said to him in reply, "Simon, I have something to say to you." "Tell me, teacher," he said. "Two people were in debt to a certain creditor; one owed five hundred days' wages and the other owed fifty. Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both. Which of them will love him more?" Simon said in reply, "The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven." He said to him, "You have judged rightly." Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon, "Do you see this woman? When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet, but she has bathed them with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You did not give me a kiss, but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she anointed my feet with ointment. So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven; hence, she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little."

Lk 7:37-47

Aug 27th 2013 new
(quote) William-607613 said: I haven't heard the correct position on this yet...

If someone wants to allow someone to cut in line for the confessional, then the truly correct action is to take that person's place at the back of the line.

(I mean, if we are really serious about being meek and charitable, then let's also be meek and charitable to those behind us who have been waiting. We have no idea what their circumstances are, and what sins they may have to confess.)

Let's really be meek and charitable.

Good point. If I told a homeless man (charitably) "I am more than happy to allow you to step ahead of me, but I can't speak for everyone else in line. Would you please ask everyone else if they are OK with it?" I wonder if the homeless man would have reconsidered the urgency of his request?
But on the same hand, if I refused his the request and my action prompted the homeless man to leave without having his confession heard, and as a result this man was unable to receive communion the next day, or in an extreme example died shortly thereafter with mortal sin on his soul, then I would have to answer to our Lord when I'm called home.
To the OP, you and your son did the right thing. You were both undoubtedly and inconsiderately inconvenienced, but you gained a small blessing and perhaps even a plenary indulgence because you did the charitable thing. 3 people had their confession heard that day, 3 people who might have left without receiving Penance had they not received the benefit of your charity.
Many years ago I once chided my mother after she told me that she met a man at the mall who gave her the old story about being stranded far from home and needing $10 for gas, which my mother promptly gave him. "Mom, that is one of the oldest scams in the book!" I told her. "That man got your $10, and probably another $100 from 10 other moms!"
My mother replied, "It doesn't matter. I was moved by the Holy Spirit to help that man, and it has been recorded in Heaven."
Smart mom, and an even better Christian. ;)


Aug 27th 2013 new
(quote) John-146319 said: Good point. If I told a homeless man (charitably) "I am more than happy to allow you to step ahead of me, but I can't speak for everyone else in line. Would you please ask everyone else if they are OK with it?" I wonder if the homeless man would have reconsidered the urgency of his request?
But on the same hand, if I refused his the request and my action prompted the homeless man to leave without having his confession heard, and as a result this man was unable to receive communion the next day, or in an extreme example died shortly thereafter with mortal sin on his soul, then I would have to answer to our Lord when I'm called home.
Or you could let him go in your place and you move to the end of the line, leaving the others unaffected. (You may well find they volunteer to let you keep your place.)
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