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This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

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Oct 7th 2013 new
I'm hesitant to post again about my bathroom trouble-floor, but here it is.

A floor guy came today, said it sounds hollow in many spots so it couldn't be the real floor. Said to remove the threshold plate to see what I could see (he wouldn't do it). After he left, that's what I did. I can see about 1/4 inch of black adhesive and the mosaic brick on top of the true foundation. I used a metal spike and a hammer, to see about breaking up the floor, but I didn't even make a dent in it. The floor guy estimated near $500 just to remove the mosaic layer. (Come on! It's only 34.5 square feet!) I can imagine they'd need to jackhammer it? Or is there another method they could use?

However, I'm back to staring at a $500 expense and still not having the job finished. As I was writing this, I thought I'd just go to Home Depot & find some compound to spread on the floor to even things out a bit (not the leveling method that was suggested earlier), then just put peel-and-stick on top, and be done with it. BUT....we had an incident Sat morning of smelling a bad smell in that bathroom--like urine-soaked kitty litter (and I don't have a cat). It stayed half the day, then went away. Reappeared Sun morning but for a much shorter time, and no smell today. WEIRD. But with the floor guy pointing out hollow spots, and that some are around the toilet, it could be that seepage has occurred there, and the best thing, even for me for the next 3 or so years, would be to get rid of this layer entirely. If I could break up and remove this flooring myself, I would do it, since I have some free time on my hands. However, maybe it IS best to pay the $500, even though that sounds way too expensive to me?

Could use some advice here.
Oct 7th 2013 new
(quote) Lina-796057 said: I'm hesitant to post again about my bathroom trouble-floor, but here it is.

A floor guy came today, said it sounds hollow in many spots so it couldn't be the real floor. Said to remove the threshold plate to see what I could see (he wouldn't do it). After he left, that's what I did. I can see about 1/4 inch of black adhesive and the mosaic brick on top of the true foundation. I used a metal spike and a hammer, to see about breaking up the floor, but I didn't even make a dent in it. The floor guy estimated near $500 just to remove the mosaic layer. (Come on! It's only 34.5 square feet!) I can imagine they'd need to jackhammer it? Or is there another method they could use?

However, I'm back to staring at a $500 expense and still not having the job finished. As I was writing this, I thought I'd just go to Home Depot & find some compound to spread on the floor to even things out a bit (not the leveling method that was suggested earlier), then just put peel-and-stick on top, and be done with it. BUT....we had an incident Sat morning of smelling a bad smell in that bathroom--like urine-soaked kitty litter (and I don't have a cat). It stayed half the day, then went away. Reappeared Sun morning but for a much shorter time, and no smell today. WEIRD. But with the floor guy pointing out hollow spots, and that some are around the toilet, it could be that seepage has occurred there, and the best thing, even for me for the next 3 or so years, would be to get rid of this layer entirely. If I could break up and remove this flooring myself, I would do it, since I have some free time on my hands. However, maybe it IS best to pay the $500, even though that sounds way too expensive to me?

Could use some advice here.
The black adhesive you mention sounds like it is often called cutback adhesive, which leads me to offer the CAUTION below.

If your tile floor was installed prior to 1984, cutback adhesive may contain asbestos fibers.

Removing the adhesive is typically either a mechanical approach (grinding/chipping) or a wet approach (solvents). Either way is no picnic - and with the possibility of asbestos in the adhesive - I am hesitant in being the one to offer up any additional advice in regards to its removal.

Maybe I am being overly cautious and asbestos is NOT an issue with the adhesive you have, which I hope is the case for you. But if it asbestos based - then covering it as opposed to removing it may be the safest way to approach the problem.

The following URL may provide you with more information in regards to dealing with the cutback adhesive.
www.flooring-professionals.com

Sorry that the advice I have given is probably the last thing that you wanted to hear sad




Oct 7th 2013 new
shocked

crazy

hissyfit

So what's the best course of action here??!
I skimmed the article you posted a link to, Dave. It mentions ungood interactions which can occur between various levelers/coverings put over what I have.... I have no experience in this area, and really don't value getting educated in it right now (other things are more important).

I guess I'm just surprised and disappointed that I can't really find a handyman (read "much less expensive") who can take care of this for me.
Oct 7th 2013 new
(quote) Tracy-929496 said: Holstein VS Black Angus...

Don't knock it til you try it!



Hi Tracy, consider a Pinzgauer to keep them company ? pinzgauers.org
Oct 7th 2013 new
(quote) Lina-796057 said: So what's the best course of action here??!
.... I have no experience in this area, and really don't value getting educated in it right now (other things are more important).
First - let it be known I am not a contractor - and the only license I hold is a driver's license laughing ( I know your thinking - that's all I need to drive to AZ and do the job for you ).

The removal job - not matter how it is tackled sounds like it is VERY labor intensive

Below is my recommendation (if i were to be the one to actually attempt to tackle it) taking into account the options listed in the previous link.

From the link - since the Mapei ECO 611 can direct bond to cutback - I would probably go with that option, which should avoid the necessity of the removal of the cutback adhesive. it looks like the product sells for about $55.00 for a 5 gallon bucket.

The above product is designed for vinyl composition tile (VCT) - a case of which costs about $40.00 and covers 45 square feet - can be purchased as Home Depot.

That is about the best I can do advice wise. I have the advantage here of collaborating with several of my brothers, throwing in some pizza while we are working and some beer when we are done - and it is amazing what we get accomplished :)

But seriously - it does sounds like you may want to consider allowing the contractors to do what needs to be done - and be done with it, otherwise you run the risk of a DIY nightmare.
Oct 28th 2013 new
UPDATE TO FLOOR PROBLEM:

It is now solved.


I found a handyman service that had very good reviews, got a quote, it turned out to be "reasonable", so I hired them (but without income now for 2 months, I had to borrow the $). Had to wait a week till they could do the job. The estimator thought the weird floor layer was one thing and that it would take sawing to remove. The worker seemed to be able to break it up easily into pieces. Wish I would've tried harder to do that myself--would've saved $180. Anyway, found 13x13 white ceramic tile on clearance, the handyman installed it, broke the toilet flange in replacing it, had to wait 4 days before he could return to install a new flange, etc. BUT THE JOB IS 99% DONE. I just finished painting the trim, scrubbing the counter, scraping little bits off the floor, wiping it down, and stepping back to admire. All that's left is to decorate and put out the red rugs and towels that I bought 3 years ago in anticipation of this new bathroom. clap Just regretful that it took so long to accomplish. sad But that's now in the past, which I cannot change.

Thank you for your suggestions on this job! I now have a number of new-to-me Internet sources I can consult for future projects as needed. biggrin
Oct 28th 2013 new
NOW, quick question:

Does old grout have to be removed before putting on new grout?
My bathroom vanity top is grouted ceramic tiles. In a handful of places, the grout has dried out and, I guess, crumbled away as I see dark spots (not mold) and some dirtiness I cannot clean away. Do I have to scrape out the grout in those areas & replace the grout, or could I just put a new thin layer over those areas to make it all look nice and white again? (No racist remark intended.)

Looking for a cheap, easy solution that would last about 3-4 years.....
Oct 28th 2013 new
Cutting it out with the proper tool is not difficult really. And thin coats tend to peel off.
Oct 28th 2013 new
Would agree with Tim that a thin coat over the top would probably not hold hold up well.
If you are comfortable with DIY, he is also correct in that it is not too difficult.

The needed tools come to $30 on sale as shown below.

The Tool I would (An oscillating multifunction tool)recommend is currently on Sale at Harbor Freight Tools for $19.99 and can be found on their site at the following URL: www.harborfreight.com I buy from Harbor Freight All the time, and it looks like they have quite a store presence for you there in Phoenix such that you probably have a local store you can pop into to check out and save on any shipping charges.

The accessory that you will want is also available from them ($9.99 on sale) and can be seen at the following URL:
www.harborfreight.com

If you are on the fence about whether to purchase the tool - their is no rush. Harbor Freight puts that particular tool on sale probably every other week - so it gives you something to think about.

If you do decide to give it a shot, a vacuum cleaner running along side of the tool as it is cutting will keep the dust to a minimum.



Oct 28th 2013 new
(quote) Dave-976637 said: Would agree with Tim that a thin coat over the top would probably not hold hold up well.
If you are comfortable with DIY, he is also correct in that it is not too difficult.

The needed tools come to $30 on sale as shown below.

The Tool I would (An oscillating multifunction tool)recommend is currently on Sale at Harbor Freight Tools for $19.99 and can be found on their site at the following URL: http://www.harborfreight.com/oscillating-multifunction-power-tool-68861-8493.html I buy from Harbor Freight All the time, and it looks like they have quite a store presence for you there in Phoenix such that you probably have a local store you can pop into to check out and save on any shipping charges.

The accessory that you will want is also available from them ($9.99 on sale) and can be seen at the following URL:
http://www.harborfreight.com/2-12-in-diamond-grit-round-multi-tool-blade-for-masonry-68957.html

If you are on the fence about whether to purchase the tool - their is no rush. Harbor Freight puts that particular tool on sale probably every other week - so it gives you something to think about.

If you do decide to give it a shot, a vacuum cleaner running along side of the tool as it is cutting will keep the dust to a minimum.



Good choice and not a bad price!! I have a dremmel and the attachments. I have also used a small v grooved chisel and small mallet.
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