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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Oct 14th 2013 new
(quote) Gabor-19025 said:

One of the lines that has been used a lot here is I think that the Holy Father.............. at one extreme is:

1) A breath of fresh air and an inspiration of the Holy Spirit, or

2) Clouding Catholic teaching.

Holy Father, please speak unambiguously and tell us what you believe without us having to second guess you. There is no good coming from speaking in riddles apart from total confusion.

Stop reading what the media says he says and read what he actually said, in context and unclouded by spin added by the media.

LOCKED
Oct 14th 2013 new
I agree with you Patrick. A leader must lead his flock and not speak in vague generalities and ambiguity, lest he risk loosing the flock.
Though I take everything the Pope supposedly says with a grain of salt as who knows if the statement is accurately reported by the time we read it.
Stay focused on the consistent teachings of Holy Mother Church in light of the Holy Scriptures.
In this case a few suggestions may help one keep thier perspective;
Matt 4:4
Matt 13
Matt 24
2 Peter 2
2 Timothy 4:1-4
And stay steeped in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.....from which all Supernatural graces flow to those willing to correspond with God's Will.
Lastly pray the daily Devotion to The Seven Sorrows of Our Lady. She will deliver us from all heresies and it is she that will crush the head if Satan!
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Oct 14th 2013 new
(quote) Steven-706921 said: For example, how about the statues and stained glass window in Catholic Churches up to the 1950s? They were more than just pretty artwork; but they were visual Gospel readings, that is sermons and readings of the Gospel without words. 
Just regarding statues and stained glass windows, I suspect (though I'm not certain) that the reduced use of statues and stained glass in churches in the past 50 years (or so), probably has more to due with high cost (due to much higher labor costs to produce these works of art) than a conscious decision to remove them from churches. I can think of a few churches built in recent decades where the high cost of these items was/is a big obstacle.

One new (about 12 years old) and quite large church (St. Clare parish) was built in a very fast-growing area of Roseville, CA (in northern CA). The church needed to be built to handle all of the new people moving to that area, but they couldn't necessarily afford to completely outfit the church with artwork right away. I believe that about three years ago they finally received commissioned artwork/sculptures for the Stations of the Cross. Everyone was rather excited to see this new addition to the church. The 6+ ft. tall crucifix hanging over the alter was quite expensive, as it was hand-carved (from wood) in Italy. I noticed a new statue of Jesus recently. The church uses colored/stained glass sparingly, but that is not uncommon on mission churches.

Although St. Clare Catholic Church may look a bit spartan by some people's tastes, the architecture is quite reminiscent of the many Spanish-style mission churches so prevalent in California and Mexico... but with a newer look. For those not familiar with the Spanish mission churches >>> See photos at link below:
www.google.com
The Spanish missions in California comprise a series of religious and military outposts established by Spanish Catholics of the Franciscan Order between 1769 and 1833 to spread the Christian faith among the local Native Americans. The missions represented the first major effort by Europeans to colonize the Pacific Coast region, and gave Spain a valuable toehold in the frontier land.

Here is a URL for St. Clare Catholic Church:
stclareroseville.com
The photos don't really do it justice, as many detail cannot be easily seen, but it will give you an idea of the architecture.

Ed
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Oct 14th 2013 new
(quote) ED-20630 said: Just regarding statues and stained glass windows, I suspect (though I'm not certain) that the reduced use of statues and stained glass in churches in the past 50 years (or so), probably has more to due with high cost (due to much higher labor costs to produce these works of art) than a conscious decision to remove them from churches. I can think of a few churches built in recent decades where the high cost of these items was/is a big obstacle.

One new (about 12 years old) and quite large church (St. Clare parish) was built in a very fast-growing area of Roseville, CA (in northern CA). The church needed to be built to handle all of the new people moving to that area, but they couldn't necessarily afford to completely outfit the church with artwork right away. I believe that about three years ago they finally received commissioned artwork/sculptures for the Stations of the Cross. Everyone was rather excited to see this new addition to the church. The 6+ ft. tall crucifix hanging over the alter was quite expensive, as it was hand-carved (from wood) in Italy. I noticed a new statue of Jesus recently. The church uses colored/stained glass sparingly, but that is not uncommon on mission churches.

Although St. Clare Catholic Church may look a bit spartan by some people's tastes, the architecture is quite reminiscent of the many Spanish-style mission churches so prevalent in California and Mexico... but with a newer look. For those not familiar with the Spanish mission churches >>> See photos at link below:
https://www.google.com/search?q=spanish+missions+california&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=J3VbUvBRyKLYBcTdgOAG&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1745&bih=868&dpr=1
The Spanish missions in California comprise a series of religious and military outposts established by Spanish Catholics of the Franciscan Order between 1769 and 1833 to spread the Christian faith among the local Native Americans. The missions represented the first major effort by Europeans to colonize the Pacific Coast region, and gave Spain a valuable toehold in the frontier land.

Here is a URL for St. Clare Catholic Church:
http://stclareroseville.com/index.cfm?load=photoalbum&album=2
The photos don't really do it justice, as many detail cannot be easily seen, but it will give you an idea of the architecture.

Ed
That is a very lovely Spanish style of Church. Here's one I like, St. Edward the Confessor parish in Granville OH, built in 2000.

www.traditional-building.com

LOCKED
Oct 15th 2013 new
(quote) Steven-706921 said: Well, all I can say to the cries of "Pharisee," to my misgivings is here is another "pharisee" heard from. Here is John Vennari's, of the Catholic Family Networks, comments.

http://www.speroforum.com/a/ALEMRVLUZQ53/74418-Catholic-conservatives-rap-Pope-Francis-over-latest-interview?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+speroforum%2Fnroq+(Spero+News)#.Ukt3JIWyQ7A


I hope everyone on here reads this interview of Pope Francis. It is remarkable.
LOCKED
Oct 17th 2013 new
(quote) Steven-706921 said: That is a very lovely Spanish style of Church. Here's one I like, St. Edward the Confessor parish in Granville OH, built in 2000.

http://www.traditional-building.com/Previous-Issues-06/DecemberProject06edward.html

Steven,

St. Edward the Confessor is also a very nice looking traditional church. Thanks for the link.

If you ever visit Sacramento, CA, the "Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament" is certainly "must see" for any Catholic and anyone that appreciates very impressive architecture. I think that even an ardent atheist would be really amazed by that cathedral. In 2005, a major $34 million renovation was completed on this cathedral that was originally constructed beginning in 1887. You can see some photos below. The photos, while most impressive, really are not a good substitute for seeing it in person. It is certainly the most beautiful cathedral that I have ever visited. Anyone that likes traditional stained glass, statues, artwork and architecture could spend a lot of time checking out this church.

www.google.com


Also, below is a link to a traditional Latin Mass at the Sacramento cathedral in May 2012.
www.youtube.com


en.wikipedia.org

Ed

LOCKED
Oct 18th 2013 new
This ought a drive you up a tree:

"A church that is closed in on itself and in the past, a church focused only on little rules, customs and attitudes betrays its own identity."

~Pope Francis on Twitter

Instead of CORRECTING the holy father, might it not be better to mortify our wills and humbly ask God to she'd light on the truths Francis is trying to reveal?


LOCKED
Oct 18th 2013 new
(quote) Tom-112790 said: ED..
Pope Francis is a nightmare for the 'holier than thou' people. These people are so like the pharisees.

Bingo!! Ding ding ding!!! We have a winner!
LOCKED
Oct 18th 2013 new
(quote) Gabor-19025 said:

One of the lines that has been used a lot here is I think that the Holy Father.............. at one extreme is:

1) A breath of fresh air and an inspiration of the Holy Spirit, or

2) Clouding Catholic teaching.

Holy Father, please speak unambiguously and tell us what you believe without us having to second guess you. There is no good coming from speaking in riddles apart from total confusion.

Amen Praying
LOCKED
Oct 18th 2013 new

POPE FRANCIS
The faith becomes ideology and ideology frightens. Ideology chases away the people. It creates distances between people and it distances the Church from the people. But it is a serious illness, this Christian ideology.

Pope Francis also added there is a difference between praying and simply saying prayers. People carried away by ideology, he concluded, do not pray, rather they repeat memorized prayers.

I an going to pray a memorized prayer (the Rosary) for this man immediately.

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