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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people under 45. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

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Homeschooling

Oct 12th 2013 new

What do you think about homeschooling? It is something that in Spain is not even permitted, I mean, all the kids go to school, and In Germany a family were homeschooling & that got them in trouble last summer ! www.theblaze.com.
But having been in the States and seeing that some people have beenn homeschooled & students in my school for one year, or a family that homeschooled their eldest kids (they have 8) I decided to read more on it & research as sometimes this topic has been brought up. After all, as a parent, we will want the best for our kids! I was mostly impressed by this family:
www.dailymail.co.uk.

Have you considered homeschooling? What are the pros you see? and cons? While I understand each experience is unique and I am happy with my education, I also feel I was very lucky with my classmates and did not experience bullying. Something that can cause kids have anxiety when going to school, dropping grades, etc. Having a safe school environment is very important too. I would love to hear your views on this topic!





Oct 12th 2013 new
(quote) Sol-496426 said:
What do you think about homeschooling? It is something that in Spain is not even permitted, I mean, all the kids go to school, and In Germany a family were homeschooling & that got them in trouble last summer ! http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/08/30/brutal-and-vicious-armed-german-police-storm-homeschoolin...
But having been in the States and seeing that some people have beenn homeschooled & students in my school for one year, or a family that homeschooled their eldest kids (they have 8) I decided to read more on it & research as sometimes this topic has been brought up. After all, as a parent, we will want the best for our kids! I was mostly impressed by this family:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2311690/The-family-sending-home-schooled-children-college-...

Have you considered homeschooling? What are the pros you see? and cons? While I understand each experience is unique and I am happy with my education, I also feel I was very lucky with my classmates and did not experience bullying. Something that can cause kids have anxiety when going to school, dropping grades, etc. Having a safe school environment is very important too. I would love to hear your views on this topic!





Sol,

The problem in the US is that public schools have become indoctrination centers for the children here, and the private schools have become quite expensive. Home schooling is the last option for those parents who want to protect their children from what is being passed off as education in the public schools but who cannot afford to send their children to private schools. It's far from an ideal solution because I believe that interaction with peers is an important part of growing up but I would opt for this before sending children to a public school.

Back in the seventies, the United Negro College Fund had a motto with their commercials: "A mind is a terrible thing to waste." We have to consider the minds of children as well as their souls.





Oct 13th 2013 new
Hi Sol.I home schooled my youngest for three years as he suffered from eczema (still does) As my other children all attended the local Primary School( Prep-grade six ) so my son knew all 30 students before he joined.The benefits of
of this small country town school are wonderful,it is like a big family.
My son joined more matured,balanced and well ahead of his peers academically.

Oct 13th 2013 new
Teaching one's children is part of the primary purpose of marriage. It's not to be delegated without good reason. It's also not the place of the state to impose curricular requirements on what parents teach their children. The Church has the authority to watch over every branch of education, as Pope Pius XI taught us in his encyclical Divini illius magistri, and the state has the duty to protect both the rights of the Church and the family in regard to education of children in its legislation.

'The family therefore holds directly from the Creator the mission and hence the right to educate the offspring, a right inalienable because inseparably joined to the strict obligation, a right anterior to any right whatever of civil society and of the State, and therefore inviolable on the part of any power on earth.

'That this right is inviolable St. Thomas proves as follows:The child is naturally something of the father . . . so by natural right the child, before reaching the use of reason, is under the father's care. Hence it would be contrary to natural justice if the child, before the use of reason, were removed from the care of its parents, or if any disposition were made concerning him against the will of the parents.

'And as this duty on the part of the parents continues up to the time when the child is in a position to provide for itself, this same inviolable parental right of education also endures. "Nature intends not merely the generation of the offspring, but also its development and advance to the perfection of man considered as man, that is, to the state of virtue" says the same St. Thomas.' -- Divini illius magistri, nos. 32-33

Every child learns at a different pace and excels at different subjects. It's up to parents to facilitate their children in a well-rounded religious and moral education, as well as see to their physical and civic training insofar as they're able to do so, and provide for the children's temporal well-being.

This being the case, it's not important for every child to learn geometry or even algebra, nor physics, computers, literature, chemistry, nor what passes for biology. These higher pursuits and beyond ought to be left up to the discretion of parents.

It seems to me most reasonable that a child ought to be able to face the world at adolescence with the ability to reason and judge finely, have the habit of good arithmetic, be able to compose and write an expository essay, be able to speak and express himself clearly and certainly, have a good and solid knowledge of the deposit of faith, be well-experienced at the practice of religion, have a firm grasp on and good habit of moral behaviour, be able to sight-read sheet music, have a working knowledge of money management, etc. In general, if the child is female, it seems most reasonable that she has the working ability to make a home for a family, and if the child is male, that he has learned or is in the process of learning a trade.

Obviously if a child (whether male or female) excels greatly at a particular subject which would benefit the common good, it is good for parents to look into particular education in that area from those professionally and classically schooled in that subject, but it's not imperative (nor necessarily advisable) to treat every child that way.

I don't see any real benefit to society to dump 30 children from disparate backgrounds into classroom seats and then try to educate them all at the same level and pace. I know this often happens under the guise of "socialization", but I don't buy it. I personally see it as a propaganda mechanism for the state, though many educators protest this (none actually give good reason, but rather most say they don't "feel" like they're propagandizing for the state).
Oct 13th 2013 new
(quote) Chelsea-743484 said: Teaching one's children is part of the primary purpose of marriage. It's not to be delegated without good reason. It's also not the place of the state to impose curricular requirements on what parents teach their children. The Church has the authority to watch over every branch of education, as Pope Pius XI taught us in his encyclical Divini illius magistri, and the state has the duty to protect both the rights of the Church and the family in regard to education of children in its legislation.

'The family therefore holds directly from the Creator the mission and hence the right to educate the offspring, a right inalienable because inseparably joined to the strict obligation, a right anterior to any right whatever of civil society and of the State, and therefore inviolable on the part of any power on earth.

'That this right is inviolable St. Thomas proves as follows:The child is naturally something of the father . . . so by natural right the child, before reaching the use of reason, is under the father's care. Hence it would be contrary to natural justice if the child, before the use of reason, were removed from the care of its parents, or if any disposition were made concerning him against the will of the parents.

'And as this duty on the part of the parents continues up to the time when the child is in a position to provide for itself, this same inviolable parental right of education also endures. "Nature intends not merely the generation of the offspring, but also its development and advance to the perfection of man considered as man, that is, to the state of virtue" says the same St. Thomas.' -- Divini illius magistri, nos. 32-33

Every child learns at a different pace and excels at different subjects. It's up to parents to facilitate their children in a well-rounded religious and moral education, as well as see to their physical and civic training insofar as they're able to do so, and provide for the children's temporal well-being.

This being the case, it's not important for every child to learn geometry or even algebra, nor physics, computers, literature, chemistry, nor what passes for biology. These higher pursuits and beyond ought to be left up to the discretion of parents.

It seems to me most reasonable that a child ought to be able to face the world at adolescence with the ability to reason and judge finely, have the habit of good arithmetic, be able to compose and write an expository essay, be able to speak and express himself clearly and certainly, have a good and solid knowledge of the deposit of faith, be well-experienced at the practice of religion, have a firm grasp on and good habit of moral behaviour, be able to sight-read sheet music, have a working knowledge of money management, etc. In general, if the child is female, it seems most reasonable that she has the working ability to make a home for a family, and if the child is male, that he has learned or is in the process of learning a trade.

Obviously if a child (whether male or female) excels greatly at a particular subject which would benefit the common good, it is good for parents to look into particular education in that area from those professionally and classically schooled in that subject, but it's not imperative (nor necessarily advisable) to treat every child that way.

I don't see any real benefit to society to dump 30 children from disparate backgrounds into classroom seats and then try to educate them all at the same level and pace. I know this often happens under the guise of "socialization", but I don't buy it. I personally see it as a propaganda mechanism for the state, though many educators protest this (none actually give good reason, but rather most say they don't "feel" like they're propagandizing for the state).
Ditto, to what Chelsea said AND this is coming from a public school teacher eyepopping. I homeschooled our three youngest until high school, AFTER they had been in Catholic school. THey all said that their homeschooling experience was the very best educational opportunity. When I registered them for high school the registrar said, "how many more children will you be sending us?" Puzzled I asked her "why?" and she said " because your kids are the most respectful and well mannered children the school has ever seen". That response validated all of those years when their father chastised me for homeschooling our kids.
Oct 13th 2013 new
(quote) Joan-529855 said: THey all said that their homeschooling experience was the very best educational opportunity. When I registered them for high school the registrar said, "how many more children will you be sending us?" Puzzled I asked her "why?" and she said " because your kids are the most respectful and well mannered children the school has ever seen".
Your children are probably light years ahead of their peers: nypost.com

Education in this country may not only be damaging to a child's soul, but to his or her mind as well.



Oct 13th 2013 new
Hi Sol,
my two daughters were Home Schooled,and are now in College.They are both good students.The years they spent in Karate and Juijitsu helped too,They both have Black Belts.Home-Schoolers can tend to get lazy tthough.College is taking care of that however.














Oct 13th 2013 new
I barely survived institutional education. I came to the conclusion that it is an unhealthy social environment. I probably won't ever be blessed with children, but I have long wanted to homeschool, which is one reason why I am still here.
Oct 13th 2013 new
Thank you for your reply, certainly the soul matters the most. I am every day more and more convinced of that & the statement of wanting a spouse that helps you and the kids you have go to Heaven. It reminds me of an article I read that stuck so much in my mind that I just had to google the sentence: kids to Heaven, not Harvard, to find it!




"I like to say that my ultimate goal for my children is Heaven, not Harvard. Now if my kids go to Harvard on the way to Heaven, thats great: But if I so focus on Harvard and success in this world that they miss Heaven, I will have failed them and for all of eternity." whole article: fbfawana.com

There seems to be a big pressure for kids to go to college, I certain without a clear aim, sometimes just for the sake of it. And to make it to Heaven is what truly matters after all!

Oct 13th 2013 new
hello Anne, I am glad it went well for you and your kid! You are right with some of the benefits of small places, this is something I have experienced living here. I hear some negative things about state schools, also in Spain! but in KS, I live in a rural town where all the kids have only one choice so kids from different backgrounds come. So kids are probably more protected overall that in bigger places, of course it always depends. And the family, regardless where you live, is usually the biggest influence for a kid.
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