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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people under 45. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

Frassati was dedicated to works of social action, charity, prayer and community.
Learn More:Pier Giorgio Frassati

Oct 13th 2013 new
Chelsea, I love your posts! they are always backed up by the Church teachings. Thank you for finding this information. I also find many times kids can learn unnecessary things, or could be learning something more interesting for them, but it is just so hard when you have as you say 30 kids and work on them individually. I love the optional HS classes where I have maybe 2 kids in advanced levels and I can be much more flexible & you can work on their passions and interests while learning a language, for example, cooking, dancing...
Oct 13th 2013 new
Joan it is awesome this worked for you in elementary and what impresses me the most is how respecful they were. This shows you did an awesome job. When I know super respecful kids at school I also tell their parents: your kids are soo respectful. One parent say "They better be! " :) Did you follow a method or you chose what to do? Did you follow a schedule or it depended on the day? Tihis is all so new to me but I want to be informed. Thank you so much!!
Oct 13th 2013 new
Hello Bernard, thank you for the reply. I see your daughters could do sports while being homeschooled, this is awesome. I heard that some kids, when they want to become more professional in Sports or it is a passion for them, as the training takes so much time, homeschooling is a great option too. I am glad College is going well for them!
Oct 13th 2013 new
Thank you for your reply Andrew, I understand your concerns, have read similar concerns on articles and some public education. I see that the family is so important that if there is no other choice, the teachings at home can bring loads of good regardless where you are sent, but of course the environment affects a lot: for both your soul and also your learning.
Oct 15th 2013 new
OP, I honestly don't believe in homeschooling. I knew a couple families in my area who went this route with their children, but most of their children ended up flunking out of college, and haven't really gone anywhere with their lives. I went to Catholic school up until my sophomore year of high school, and even that, compared to public school, was like comparing apples to oranges, no comparison. I learned more in the 2 years of public school I had than in anything in Catholic. On one hand, I would send my younger children to Catholic school so they get a good foundation in our faith, but once high school rolls around, I probably would send them to public. The schools in my area are some of the best in the state, and I would rather have them go there.
Oct 15th 2013 new
(quote) Matthew-998283 said: OP, I honestly don't believe in homeschooling. I knew a couple families in my area who went this route with their children, but most of their children ended up flunking out of college, and haven't really gone anywhere with their lives. I went to Catholic school up until my sophomore year of high school, and even that, compared to public school, was like comparing apples to oranges, no comparison. I learned more in the 2 years of public school I had than in anything in Catholic. On one hand, I would send my younger children to Catholic school so they get a good foundation in our faith, but once high school rolls around, I probably would send them to public. The schools in my area are some of the best in the state, and I would rather have them go there.
Matthew,

I think it's safe to say that experiences differ with schools. I had left public school in the sixth grade to go to a Catholic school. By the time I reached Catholic high school some three years later, I had was one full year ahead of my former classmates (in terms of the subject matter taught and learned) who had stayed in public school and then gone to the Catholic high school.

As far as the experiences of the families you know in your area who home-schooled their children, I certainly don't question what you have written, but they would be the exception to the rule. Home-schooled children not only graduate college at higher rates than those educated in private or public schools, they graduate with higher GPAs. www.usnews.com.


Oct 15th 2013 new
Here's a twist: I teach in public school and pay to put my kids in Catholic school. If I didn't need health insurance I'd quit in a heartbeat and homeschool.

(Assembling soapbox for a rant)

The blessing and curse of public school is we must educate every child. It is nearly impossible to differentiate for gifted, average, intellectually challenged, behaviorally disordered, and special needs simultaneously. Just try to imagine all these kids at your dining room table. It's impossible to have a meaningful, deep conversation with the gifted kid, give adequate pacing and support to intermediates and and intellectually challenged kids and try to keep the bd kid from hurting herself or someone else. Yet we ask our public school teachers to accomplish this task every day, day in and day out. No wonder teachers burn out.

If people live in an economically homogeneous area, the population will self select and the public school teachers will look effective, even tremendous. For those of us who teach in areas rife with poverty, gang violence, and linguistic and ethnic diversity, the job is impossible. Our scores will never stack up with wealthier schools because our kids start so far behind. My school averages 30% transience and we lose at least one kid a year to shootings. (I am so sick of kids' funerals.) Kids are bringing weapons to school; we just don't usually see them. When we do, we have procedures. The teachers I work with are called to minister to the poor, yet we have to have our prayer meetings before school and speak of Jesus in hushed tones. And No Child Left Behind wants to cut our funding? Put those politicians in my classroom for ONE DAY. The kids will eat them alive.

(Dissassembling soapbox)

My particular ministry is teaching English to refugees. This is where my frightened, poor, shell shocked and disenfranchised students land, so this is where I will be, waiting to guide them. I love my job and my students and the ONLY thing I would trade it for is the ability to better care of my own two children.

I pay for Catholic school so my kids get the academic rigor, faith formation and respect for adults that I demand in my interactions with them. To return to the topic, I would homeschool so I could increase the rigor even more, focus on my children's unique gifts and spend the best part of my day with my kids instead of 4-8 pm, when I am already tired.

Oct 15th 2013 new
We homeschooled our oldest two from grade 2 through high school. I was the principle educator from grade 7 on. Both have graduated or will this spring. Both magma cum loude. One in biochemistry, the other in biology with a specialty in parasites. Both intend to do graduate work or med school.

The next four I home schooled from
day one. While they are in public school now they hate it. However they all are 4.0 students in their respective grades. The youngest does well, but is emotionally behind most likely to the divorce.

Homeschooling works and works well if you are committed. Kind of like marriage.
Oct 16th 2013 new
I would send them to public school. It's free.
Oct 16th 2013 new
(quote) Justin-1002926 said: I would send them to public school. It's free.
If you're going to be judged by Our Lord for the formation of your children, you'd really choose to forgo temporal monetary cost and leave the formation of your children up to an anti-Catholic institution?
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