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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people under 45. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

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Oct 16 new
(quote) Tom-112790 said: Tim,
My guess is that you are very well educated.-And that that was a huge factor in the success of your kids with home schooling.
Tom,

The research that confirms home-schooled children outperform their peers in public and private schools makes no mention of a need for well-educated parents in order for the children to succeed. www.usnews.com

I think if there are any steps a parent can take to ensure their children succeed both academically and morally, they really ought to take it. A recent study confirms something that many of us probably suspected for some time: the American adult is dumber than the average human: nypost.com

The "establishment" education in this country has been an abject failure.



Oct 16 new
(quote) Tim-734178 said: We homeschooled our oldest two from grade 2 through high school. I was the principle educator from grade 7 on. Both have graduated or will this spring. Both magma cum loude. One in biochemistry, the other in biology with a specialty in parasites. Both intend to do graduate work or med school.

The next four I home schooled from
day one. While they are in public school now they hate it. However they all are 4.0 students in their respective grades. The youngest does well, but is emotionally behind most likely to the divorce.

Homeschooling works and works well if you are committed. Kind of like marriage.
wow Congratulations on those results Tim for your role in that!
Oct 16 new
(quote) Justin-1002926 said: Yes I started that thread. I don't know my part though. How does one figure that out?
Hey Justin- the free public school
- what are you studying?
I tried Loyola- it was really hard
is the public school hard?
Oct 16 new
(quote) Monica-291280 said: I just want to put it out there that I am a practicing Catholic who taught public school for over 30 some years. I was not the only teacher on the staff who also taught CCD, or was in the church choir, or in many other ways was an active practicing Catholic. We also had active, practicing Jews, Methodists, Lutherans etc in the faculty and staff, and our students were from many faiths, and they would sometimes tell about being at Sunday school, Bible Study, or preparing for First Communion or Confirmation. ( Overheard a hilarious conversation where a 4th grade boy was trying to explain First Communion to a Jehovah's Witness) There were some who didn't seem to ever go to any place of worship at all.The Lord loves all children, even the ones who haven't met Him yet. In all my years of teaching elementary school, I never saw anything in the curriculum that made me worry that I was doing something wrong or teaching something that was not compatible with the word of the Lord.

There are some classes new governments in the world are introducing. For example in Spain, with the previous President, many polices anti family anti life anti all...including their views of sex of course. were introduced. A new class subject was introduced called: Education for Citizenship , new textbooks made for that class contained all those policies. Philosophy and social sciences teachers were the ones supposed to teach that, some teachers objected to that, also in Religious Schools they taught but of course from the Christian point of view. What about all the other kids that go to public schools? My mother is a teacher too in a public school, when she found out about this new class and that the school was deciding what book to chose she called the publishing company that is just good to send a sample. Thanks God the school chose hers, that in an elementary school! & many times parents are not even aware of what kids are being taught, as schools should be trustworthy! Now, this class subject has been taken out of the curriculum...
Oct 16 new
(quote) John-842063 said: Hey Justin- the free public school
- what are you studying?
I tried Loyola- it was really hard
is the public school hard?
Hey John,
I am not in school. I'm sure Loyola is much harder than the public university I graduated. Nonetheless, I do regret leaving the pre-theologate at Franciscan Steubenville. FEAR drove me away because I thought it was going to be too hard.
Oct 16 new
OK I cannot even see your whole message for some reason, so were you also not serious about choosing public over catholic school?
Oct 16 new
(quote) Justin-1002926 said: Hey John,
I am not in school. I'm sure Loyola is much harder than the public university I graduated. Nonetheless, I do regret leaving the pre-theologate at Franciscan Steubenville. FEAR drove me away because I thought it was going to be too hard.
My apologies- the site had cut off much of your message. I can see any course of study possibly being too hard,
I know Loyola was too hard to carry with a full time job at the same time- mostly due to course design I feel, but also because of my preparation and I am getting older. So are you working now?
JB
Oct 17 new
(quote) William-607613 said: Tom,

The research that confirms home-schooled children outperform their peers in public and private schools makes no mention of a need for well-educated parents in order for the children to succeed. http://www.usnews.com/education/high-schools/articles/2012/06/01/home-schooled-teens-ripe-for-college

I think if there are any steps a parent can take to ensure their children succeed both academically and morally, they really ought to take it. A recent study confirms something that many of us probably suspected for some time: the American adult is dumber than the average human: http://nypost.com/2013/10/08/us-adults-are-dumber-than-the-average-human/

The "establishment" education in this country has been an abject failure.



Well, this article makes no reference of socio-economic factors whatsoever. I am willing to bet a whole lot that home schooling families are on average better off than the average American household - the fact that they are almost universally families with two parents would be enough to guarantee that, anyway. I am not saying that home schooling isn't great. One of my friends from college was home schooled, and now he's getting a PhD at Berkeley. A home schooled brother of another friend went to Princeton. However, these kids would have done great if they'd gone to Catholic, Christian, or public school - and the parents they had would almost certainly have been able to well inculcate the values of their respective faiths, as well evidenced by their ability to teach their children their faiths in addition to the regular school curriculum.

Certainly home schooling has much to commend it. I am personally glad I was not home schooled. It took me a long enough time to come out of my shell as it was.
Oct 18 new
(quote) William-607613 said: Tom,

The research that confirms home-schooled children outperform their peers in public and private schools makes no mention of a need for well-educated parents in order for the children to succeed. http://www.usnews.com/education/high-schools/articles/2012/06/01/home-schooled-teens-ripe-for-college

I think if there are any steps a parent can take to ensure their children succeed both academically and morally, they really ought to take it. A recent study confirms something that many of us probably suspected for some time: the American adult is dumber than the average human: http://nypost.com/2013/10/08/us-adults-are-dumber-than-the-average-human/

The "establishment" education in this country has been an abject failure.



William,
I read those articles and saw nothing to prove that home schooling is better than public education.
And nothing to refute my claim that those homeschooled by parents with higher educations are 'likely' to do better than those whose parent(s) arent well educated.

Very few percentage-wise in the minority communities are going to opt for homeschooling for a variety of reasons.
Therefore those statistics about drop out rates in college are certainly skewed--as many in the minority communities have lower acceptance standards into college.

and you said "..no mention of a need for well-educated parents in order for the children to succeed"--I never said there was a 'need'..but that there was a much greater likelihood of the homeschooler with the better educated parent succeeding.sure some with poorly educated parents will succeed just like some in public school with poorly educated parents will succeed.

The establishment education in this country has been a failure mainly in the poorer areas due to many things. The fact that the USA has larger ghettos and more immigrants now from countries like Mexico and Guatemala skews things towards the negative when comparing test scores with western european nations.

High schools in the USA from upper middle class areas compare very well academically to those in europe.
Oct 18 new
I homeschooled my son for half a year at the beginning of middle school. We had moved to the country and the kiddos moved from Catholic school to public school, which was great in elementary, but middle school which is a hard time period was horrible.

These are some of the problems I have seen with homeschooling:
Parents have to be vigilant regarding what books they choose to use. There are a lot of textbook stores out there which are there for one purpose only and that is to support a fundamentalist agenda.

If parents are going to homeschool, they really need to tap into the resources available to them through community groups and through schools such as the Kolbe Academy which is a day school and also provides curricula and assistance to homeschooling parents. Another advantage of Kolbe is that it is a classical education something that our kids are suffering from a lack of, in my opinion.

One of the greatest advantages of homeschooling is the direct one on one education and a flexibility to allow for creativity in lesson design and the freedom to address each child's particular learning style and needs.

We are the priimary educators of our children. I do believe however that can be accomplished through any number of means, Private, Parochial, Home, or Public. It is up to us to be involved in their learning throughout the day. And, I would argue that our primary educational responsibility is to provide religious education through discussion, Religious instruction at Church/ school and most importantly in our behavior and actions.

As a university level educator, I have had homeschooled children who were fantastic and I have had some who were mediocre. Just as I have had students from other educational backgrounds who were fantastic and those who weren't.
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