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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
Learn More: Tobias & Sarah as led by Saint Raphael

Oct 30th 2013 new
I exhale after reading what you wrote David Please add St Catherine of Siena and Saint Mary Magdalene to your rendition of those whose willingness to humbly surrender in love to be only thrown into ecstasy realizing Christ's love.
Quote:"" Feminine beauty, loving kindness, and fruitfulness are powerfully alluring mysteries"the eupherical beauty of woman, her procreative nature her ability to lovingly in race love and nurture are gifts of an inherent spirit of female. The other half.
Both sides are to unite as one body in order to perfect the other and the plan that God has intended for each and expressed only in one.
Thank you s much for sharing your deep thoughts, reflections and reading. Thank you for also posting it so many can read , reflect and respond.
Personally as a younger child when I learnt what St Catherine did to dissuade any likelihood for betrothal by cutting her hair and refusing to come out of her room except to help do dishes etc. was one that made my eyes go wide and I was incredulous at her sound inner knowingness of herself that she only wanted to be with Christ. It amazed me then how she could just do that and be so sure and it still does.


Oct 30th 2013 new
oops embrace
Oct 30th 2013 new
Hi James,

As per Pope Francis' plane interview, alluding to Pope JPII's definitively closing of the door on women's ordination, it is a red (cardinal?) herring issue. Quite dead on arrival, I might add. I am sorry to be a bearer of any bad news. You might find folks interested in that topic in the Apologetics forum which might cater to speculative Theology. The developing of a profound Catholic Theology of Woman within objective, ontological and practical reality is enough of a mystery and the theme of this forum topic.

Oct 31st 2013 new
(quote) David-174079 said: Hi James,

As per Pope Francis' plane interview, alluding to Pope JPII's definitively closing of the door on women's ordination, it is a red (cardinal?) herring issue. Quite dead on arrival, I might add. I am sorry to be a bearer of any bad news. You might find folks interested in that topic in the Apologetics forum which might cater to speculative Theology. The developing of a profound Catholic Theology of Woman within objective, ontological and practical reality is enough of a mystery and the theme of this forum topic.

Hi David et alia,

I'm not talking about women's ordination. I'm talking about a woman cardinal, as I thought I made clear. I would think that the topic of women cardinals is very relevant, since cardinals vote on who becomes pope. Should not women have some say, in the form of voting, on your "profound theology of women", aside from this forum?

James ☺
Oct 31st 2013 new
(quote) David-174079 said: Good Morning, Karen!

You sound like Mother Teresa who said something like, "Mary is the mother of Jesus; without her He wouldnt have been born. No Mary, no Jesus.

My mother passed away this year. The tears in my shy siblings eyes spoke profoundly enough, "No Mom. No more loving wisdom on earth for her children and grandchildren."

I gave the eulogy. I suppose I could have given a four word eulogy, "No mom. No me" and sat down. When I see feminine greatness whether it is Mary, womanhood, in wives, sisters, or moms, I cannot stop singing praises!

When I love someone I want to know, cherish, and praise every single precious detail about them....especially in the light of God.

Its not complicated. It's called Love.


Hi David,

I am very sorry about your mother. Please accept my sincere sympathies and prayers

rosary

James ☺
Oct 31st 2013 new
Hi Catherine Ro,

I had some time to reflect on your thought-provoking (thank you!) question. I wish to complete my response. I cannot speak for other men. I am a natural leader. A father. I have received ample scholarships and anointing, recognition and reward, in this area of my life. For me to be a good king (provider) and prophet (protector) have been fairly easy assents. By far, the most difficult and loneliest ascent (pun intended) has been to be a priest (spiritual guide). An intercessor, mediator, one who loves not just in service and suffering, but sacrificially. There are few male role models around who are really gifted (St. Joseph) spiritual, moral, and material leaders in our society. When I see most women take up these roles, I feel it is often out of necessity, not deepest desire. Any woman who knows the exhilaration of dancing with a man who knows how to lead gracefully I hope will agree. Only cliches seem to get at volumes of reflections...But power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. And it his hard to teach old dogs new tricks. In the land of blind people the one eyed man is king. There are just as few good spiritual followers. I have seen women defer leadership role to a man in their household and quickly wrench it away just as quick, like Lucy with Charlie Brown. The moral burden lays heavy on men to be leaders. It is exhausting. The older one gets, the wiser on gets. It is much easier to follow orders than command. The worries that accompany command speed the arrival of death. Men need prayer support that, sadly, is missing. I spoke to another leader friend the other day and said, "I feel like I have to be both the woman and man in relationships, the more contemplative and active, the heart and the head, the breadwinner and homemaker." We agreed that seemingly the closer one draws to God, like God, the more one's gender transcends gender stereotypes.

I do believe the "holy order of love" should reign in a family. But that men, graced by the Holy Spirit, have a gift of the "holy love of order". The ability to initiate and execute the priorities and structure in a household that keep his family safe and children with the security to flourish. This is true in the Domestic Church and the Catholic Church. I believe there is a Divine/supernatural, natural/moral, and material/physical order to reality that, if it is lived in accord with, brings harmony, joy, and mercy to the world. Some say simply it is Jesus -Others - Self. I like cheesy aliterations because they are easy to teach mnemonics: Faith, family, friends, freedom, fitness, finances, and fun. Making dance steps, decisions, in the exact order matters. I may propose a dance to a lady, but I do not impose myself on ladies who do not have their dance moves down pat. I am too old to quibble and step on toes.

Life, in the Trinity, with Mary, is a perichoresis, a dance for me. Praying theheart theheart

Oct 31st 2013 new
Monsignor James,

Thank you! I am sure you will school me in innumerable areas when the timing is right. I have a hunch that if a lady saw your brilliant exchange you will be "nabbed" soon! biggrin So, it is "either heads up" or "congratulations!"

I woke up this morning thinking of the charism of Saint James described by Hans Urs von Balthasar in his book, Church Authority and the Petrine Element.

Oct 31st 2013 new
Isn't theology analysis and isn't analysis a way in which a created thinking being honours its creator? Isn't God in the details and isn't wondering about the details a way of wondering about God?
Oct 31st 2013 new
(quote) David-174079 said: Monsignor James,

Thank you! I am sure you will school me in innumerable areas when the timing is right. I have a hunch that if a lady saw your brilliant exchange you will be "nabbed" soon! So, it is "either heads up" or "congratulations!"

I woke up this morning thinking of the charism of Saint James described by Hans Urs von Balthasar in his book, Church Authority and the Petrine Element.

Uh huh.
Oct 31st 2013 new
(quote) Roystan-340472 said: Isn't theology analysis and isn't analysis a way in which a created thinking being honours its creator? Isn't God in the details and isn't wondering about the details a way of wondering about God?
Hi Roystan!

Your observation coincides with a couple other posts, who likely will not know even that I am trying to dialogue with them...

Analysis is the breaking down a whole into its component parts even to the most microscopic details. It is a fruitful approach for understanding any being, including God. Generally it is used by scientists. Our technologically driven society reinforces this mode of knowing. But, to a ridiculously lopsided degree. Analysis can "dissect to kill" and in decision-making cause a "paralysis of analysis" in the face of so much detail and decisions. I can only imagine that all the beautiful faces on CM only exacerbates the endless Hamlet side of analytically inclined persons. laughing

Fortunately, there is the mode of knowing "in the heart" that connects the dots and assembles them back into a whole picture. I prefer to say "composes" them. Others might use the antonym of analysis, ie. synthesis. Some might call it "intuition". It is so immediate and inspiring that one hardly knows it is operating. Artists who compose music, poems, dances, paintings, etc. rely on it a great deal.

We need both. It is both/and.

This is the important part. God is also not just in the "details" and His existence and attributes knowable through "analysis". I have equal facility in both modes. The mode I see least exercised in most people is "intellectus", not intelligence, but the intuitive glance of the mind's or heart's eye that is shared by great poets, philosophers, children, mothers, fathers and lovers. And, theologians. The look of pure wonder. Of Miranda. It is hard not to have this "existential affinity with being and Being" in beautiful places like Australia and Sedona. Or, if someone is immersed within a beautiful liturgy or cathedral. If it were not for the likes of Joseph Pieper, Leisure: The Basis of Culture, Hans Ur Von Balthasar, Pope Benedict XVI, and, recently, Fr. Robert Barron I would have gone stark raving mad! The non-Catholic artists in my town, and I think society in general, are so far ahead of the Catholics in the pursuit of Beauty that one has to either settle for really boring legalistic, moralistic, bureaucratic (read: analysis run amok) Catholics or be considered some kind of aesthete.

The mode of knowing that marries analysis and synthesis, small detail and global picture, univocal and equivocal thinking is "analogical". It is a huge key, if not the key to thinking Both/And, sacramentally, like a Catholic. United to Faith, Hope and Love...it is the master key to "mystagogy"...a place where all Baptized, Confirmed, and "Eucharistized" Catholics should be... inner understanding of the Sacred Mysteries of our Faith. A vision that allows them to see Jesus broken in the Eucharist, the Mystical Body of Christ, others, including themselves.





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