Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free

info: Please Sign Up or Sign In to continue.

A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
Learn More: Saint Augustine

Feb 20th 2014 new
error: This doesn't make any sense.
Feb 20th 2014 new

If given two weeks to live, I would be in shock and likely go into my primary defense of an intellectual mode. I have been present at many deaths, would know about what to immediately expect, and would have minimal anxiety in that regard. My emphasis would be on making sure that my affairs were in order and ensuring the well-being of my animal companions. I would write a brief obituary to spare my sibling survivors that difficult task. It would include that I tried to live my life with a spirit devoted to the well-being of people, animals, and making the world a better place. I would be cremated and have modest services, as I believe my money would be better spent allocated to the living. I know this is more than you are asking, Sharon, but I cannot take my thoughts out of their context.

Feb 20th 2014 new
I couldn't write my own obituary, but I know what I hope those I leave behind would say about me. That I loved completely and loved well. That I was always ready to serve another. That I lived my faith and now rest at the feet of Our Lord.

One thing I wish they still did in obits is add how the person passed. Old obituaries are far more personal than the scripted ones of today.

If I knew I had only two weeks left, I would be far more concerned with writing letters of love to those that matter to me, so they never have to doubt what they meant to me.
Feb 20th 2014 new
(quote) Lauren-927923 said: I couldn't write my own obituary, but I know what I hope those I leave behind would say about me. That I loved completely and loved well. That I was always ready to serve another. That I lived my faith and now rest at the feet of Our Lord.

One thing I wish they still did in obits is add how the person passed. Old obituaries are far more personal than the scripted ones of today.

If I knew I had only two weeks left, I would be far more concerned with writing letters of love to those that matter to me, so they never have to doubt what they meant to me.
Lauren, Yes writing letters to those you care about is very impressive and worthy. I surely would do that.
A lady I know, whom I work with lost her mother, she died of cancer. Her mother wrote journals and to this day, she often will bring one of her journals in and will sit and read it. She loves and misses her mother so much. She will get teary eyed reading her mother's writings. It is touching to see her do this. I believe it helps her to carry on.


rose

Feb 20th 2014 new
(quote) Lauren-927923 said: I couldn't write my own obituary, but I know what I hope those I leave behind would say about me. That I loved completely and loved well. That I was always ready to serve another. That I lived my faith and now rest at the feet of Our Lord.

One thing I wish they still did in obits is add how the person passed. Old obituaries are far more personal than the scripted ones of today.

If I knew I had only two weeks left, I would be far more concerned with writing letters of love to those that matter to me, so they never have to doubt what they meant to me.
good morning,

I couldn't agree with you more on writing letters to the ones you loved. My father must have mailed about 200 letters to me over a year period when I moved my family out here. He was so sad as I was the first and only one to move out of state and we were so close. I have always written little notes to my kids so that they could hold onto them and read how much they mean to me. As far as obituaries, if the mortuary does them, they very straight and to the point on the surviving. If the family takes the obituary to the newspaper, or now you can do it online, a family has the necessary time to put in a more personal touch.

blessings,
sharon
Feb 20th 2014 new
(quote) Carol-1007500 said:

If given two weeks to live, I would be in shock and likely go into my primary defense of an intellectual mode. I have been present at many deaths, would know about what to immediately expect, and would have minimal anxiety in that regard. My emphasis would be on making sure that my affairs were in order and ensuring the well-being of my animal companions. I would write a brief obituary to spare my sibling survivors that difficult task. It would include that I tried to live my life with a spirit devoted to the well-being of people, animals, and making the world a better place. I would be cremated and have modest services, as I believe my money would be better spent allocated to the living. I know this is more than you are asking, Sharon, but I cannot take my thoughts out of their context.

Good morning Carol,

I completely understand about taking things out of context, however, their are people that I have spoken to that have prepared all the necessary things here in life to make sure their loved ones are taken care of, they also have left in their notebook, a brief letter on how they'd like to be remembered. So it's kind of a neat idea that they could blend their thoughts along with the families thoughts in their obit. I love how you take care of animals, I have to say I just love them!!!!

blessings,
sharon
Feb 20th 2014 new
(quote) Cindy-534370 said: Lauren, Yes writing letters to those you care about is very impressive and worthy. I surely would do that.
A lady I know, whom I work with lost her mother, she died of cancer. Her mother wrote journals and to this day, she often will bring one of her journals in and will sit and read it. She loves and misses her mother so much. She will get teary eyed reading her mother's writings. It is touching to see her do this. I believe it helps her to carry on.




What a great idea and very touching to be able to read something so personal, it would be like having her right there in the room!

blessings,
sharon
Feb 20th 2014 new
Hello, Sharon.

Since I was born into this world with no fanfare, I'd like to depart in the same manner. angel

Feb 20th 2014 new
(quote) Nilda-834707 said: Hello, Sharon.

Since I was born into this world with no fanfare, I'd like to depart in the same manner.

Hi Nilda,

Have to say, your forum on your music for valentines sure was a great hit! I too, was born like you with no fanfare, except I know I was God's fan, afterall, he called me into this world. So if my obituary gave all the credit to God and my walk and journey with God, then that's is how it will read.

blessings,
sharon
Feb 20th 2014 new
This will likely seem morbid, but at age 22 I did just what you're asking: I actually wrote my own obituary. I did not intend or hope to die anytime soon, but I was in a reflective period of my life (who isn't at age 22?!) and enjoyed expressing myself in words. I was very pleased with it....until my parents saw it on the computer and understandably freaked out!

However, the tragic death two years ago of a dear friend of my brother's even prompted my then 29 year-old brother to assemble a list of people he'd want notified if he passed. He has traveled the globe and lived on all sides of the country, so our family is not acquainted with many of his friends.

Such preparations are sensible to me if one desires to to make them, but I recommend informing loved ones that such preparations are merely to ease one own's mind rather than an indication of intent to die imminently.
Posts 11 - 20 of 69