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Single Living

By John-669229


“Love comes from prayer, and prayer comes from remaining in seclusion.” –St. Isaac of Syria

As I look at this phrase, I tend to dismantle it piece by piece. I think it is one of the best ways to describe the origin of love, because prayer is all about coming into relationship with God and, as St. John tells us, “God is love” (1 John 4:8).

It makes sense, then, that prayer increases our capacity for love – for the more we come to know God, who is love, the more we come to know what true love is.

The second part goes, “and prayer from remaining in seclusion.” This is an interesting concept to wrap one’s mind around. I know that personally some of my most productive prayer time is alone with the Lord in adoration. This seclusion eventually forces me to look inward and assess my own weaknesses and my utter inability to do anything pleasing to God without His grace.

Seclusion and prayer are like this intricate dance; each one helps the other out, like a couple doing a waltz. The ultimate result is something that is absolutely beautiful. As of late, I’ve been wrestling with this single state of life. In a sense, I am secluded.

This leads me to consider what God said of Adam, “It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a suitable partner for him” (Gen 2:18). We all know what God was thinking, but I wonder what it was like for Adam?

He really was secluded; there was no other rational human being for him to even converse with. Imagine what his prayer must have been like! All he had was God. The prayer born out of that type of seclusion must have been phenomenal. And at that point, he hadn’t sinned! Man, his prayer and love must have been out of this world!

Maybe all of us in the single state of life should take note of this and not wallow in our seclusion, but instead allow it to cultivate in us a powerful prayer life, thus cultivating a powerful capacity to love. This seclusion is only the preparation for a great love for whomever God has destined for me.


Reflection question: What fruits have you reaped from seclusion this Lent?



Editor’s note

Read more Lenten reflections written by CatholicMatch members:

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4 Comments

  1. Marie-575233 April 20, 2011

    There is no greater love there is to be experienced than communing with God. God is love itself.

  2. Johanna-712278 April 20, 2011

    It is better to light the candle than curse the darkness…once the candle is lighted begin to pray while looking at the light…keep praying…do not get bored…do not have expectations just pray while looking at a picture of Jesus….meditate …reflect…contemplate…get into the zone…keep praying and talking to God at the same time….now you are on a journey with God…connecting…this will bring you to a place that only you and God can really intuit into a full spiritual fullfillment that you are looking for…this is what they call in this world to ” re-charge your battery”, with GOD. It is a high level of meditation that is called “Spiritual Fullfillment”. And in order to have it on a daily basis it is to be obtained by Prayerful Life.
    This is the stuff that humans look for in drugs, to be “high in this world we live in…so let us all light a candle than curse the darkness, what dt you say? Sounds fun, and be careful too, it is addictive,You will be searching for it and yearning for it too.

  3. Maria-382240 April 20, 2011

    “Maybe all of us in the single state of life should take note of this and not wallow in our seclusion, but instead allow it to cultivate in us a powerful prayer life, thus cultivating a powerful capacity to love. This seclusion is only the preparation for a great love for whomever God has destined for me.”

    love this! thanks!

  4. Gayle-713586 April 26, 2011

    Thank you John 669229! your post was just what I needed to hear.

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