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I love my apartment. No, let me clarify, I love living in an apartment. For the vast majority of my post-college years, I have enjoyed the ease and flexibility of apartment life. I’m more than willing to compromise on the size of my living space for the convenience that comes from not having to shovel a driveway, mow the lawn or God forbid, replace a roof or appliance.

Would it make financial sense for my roommate, another 20-something, career-driven female, and I to make a down payment on a starter house and take advantage of a low-interest first-time homebuyer’s loan? With the housing market making a comeback and considering how much I pay in rent (so conveniently siphoned from my banking account each month), the answer is yes. But just like thousands of other females, we’re not leaving our two-bedroom apartment anytime soon.

As a recent CNBC article reports, even as housing and the greater economy improve, the rental apartment market still beats out the housing market—all because of women.

My generation, known as Millennials, is delaying marriage and motherhood in favor of a career or adventure-driven 20s, and because of this, birth and fertility rates are dropping. The female fertility rate is at its lowest level in recorded U.S. history, according to the Centers for Disease Control/Raymond James research.

Instead of settling down post-college in a cozy house in the suburbs with a doting husband, baby and white picket fence, we’re hanging our college diplomas in our cramped apartments and relegating visions of our dream houses to our Pinterest boards.

Through apartment living, we have the flexibility to move where our careers may take us or eventually, where we decide to settle down with our spouses. In my case, I’m thankful for my lease, which allows me the chance to easily move into my boyfriend’s house someday after we’re married or sell his house and purchase a new home together. Selling one home seems infinitely better than selling two.

Even with my views on apartment living, I do admire the few 20-something female friends of mine who decided to balk this trend and become modern-day Rosie the Riveters, investing in household necessities (aren’t blinds exciting?) and spending their Saturdays at the local hardware store sans a spouse. These brave few are the ones that make up the only 34 percent of both men and women under the age of 35 who own a home, according to a Raymond James report.

Only time will tell if my Millennial generation will continue to fuel the burgeoning rental market, but with marriage and babies not yet on the horizon for me and many of my female counterparts, I suspect that this trend will only continue.

After all, I’m only 25.

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15 Comments

  1. Lesley-158563 February 3, 2013

    Interesting article, but really not a new phenomenon at all.

  2. Josh-196444 February 4, 2013

    Interesting article. More men than women live at home, but some of that is due to more women having better careers and thus are able to live independently.

  3. Carolina-940653 February 4, 2013

    So she wants to buy a house with a career driven female friend and she has a “boyfriend”. I guess that’s not serious. Weird article.

    • Josh-196444 February 5, 2013

      It may have read confusing here. Quote:
      “Would it make financial sense for my roommate, another 20-something, career-driven female, and I to make a down payment on a starter house and take advantage of a low-interest first-time homebuyer’s loan? With the housing market making a comeback and considering how much I pay in rent (so conveniently siphoned from my banking account each month), the answer is yes. But just like thousands of other females, we’re not leaving our two-bedroom apartment anytime soon.”

      There is too much before …”the answer is yes.” Make the sentences shorter, tighter. As a writer myself, it was well-organized, although the sentence structure could have been improved.

      Also:

      delaying marriage and motherhood in favor of a career or adventure-driven 20s, and because of this, birth and fertility rates are dropping.

      it should say:
      “in favor of either a career or an adventurous lifestyle. Consequently, birth and fertility rates are dropping.”

      Not big things, but they would improve the flow of the story. The subsequent line is the best in the story. GREAT imagery.

      “We’re hanging our college diplomas in our cramped apartments and relegating visions of our dream houses to our Pinterest boards.”

  4. Carolina-940653 February 4, 2013

    In fact, when I re-read the article I’m amazed this was published. She’s a terrible writer. All over the place. No real foundations-even the thrown in part about marrying her future boyfriend…ugh..why did I bother to read this?

    • Jessica-744973 February 4, 2013

      Thanks for your feedback, Carolina, and everyone else, as well. I am, in fact, not planning on buying a house with my roommate, which I mention in the article. I do value family life, as well as my career, and renting is the right option for me at this time. I wrote this article out of the perspective that I know many of my peers have, although I know there are many different views on this topic. I appreciate your perspectives!

    • Josh-196444 February 5, 2013

      I think she is a good writer and the article is interesting. The benefit about apartment living is that you are not permanently rooted in case things have to change and it gives you flexibility.

  5. Lisa-572677 February 4, 2013

    Very disappointed to see CM promote this sort of drivel. If it were 1967 and Marlo Thomas wrote the article it would be news, but we’ve already had a generation or more who has lived these lifestyles. Nobody at work will ever be as important as the people at home.
    And, just for the record, Rosie Riveter was a nicknamed for gals who worked in factories during WWII. She has nothing to do with homeownership. There are many considerations to homeownership. One of the reasons renter are choosing to rent and not buy is because the lack of appreciation in real estate. Still, in general, one should only purchase if there are plans to stay in the home 5 or so years.

  6. Lynn-189934 February 4, 2013

    Agreed, with Lisa. This career-girl nonsense (Career girls can have as fulfilling a life as married women) all started with Marlo and was promoted even more with the extremely popular, and pretty, Mary Tyler Moore. While I liked the program, the idea that your work friends become your social friends and substitute for family is drivel. That generation embraced it, and socialized, etc. with their work friends. This generation, at least, wants to get away from work and people from work; I enjoy driving to another town to work. . . so I don’t have to run into people from work. Work and home are separate. Anyway, no wonder there are no young single women (under 40) to speak of in my town. The only apartment rentals that are reasonable are income-adjusted/based. You have to rent a house, and its as expensive to rent as to buy; many end up buying and then moving, but owning a rental. . .

    A silly article, indeed.

    • Josh-196444 February 5, 2013

      So you’re saying the apartments and houses are both expensive to rent?
      Also, interesting point on people buying a place, moving and then renting it out to generate extra income. Happens in my town.

      Career girls do have freedom to do what they want, so, in a Carrie Bradshaw-like way, they can still have a guy and their career and if the career necessitates a change, they can move and be flexible. It really sounds like the best of both worlds.

      Also, as noted, being able to afford an apartment is dependent on your career. If you are in sales/marketing, you will be able to pull it off, unlike someone in journalism.

  7. Don-374663 February 6, 2013

    Let’s not forget the fact that she sounds proud of the fact that our society is not increasing it’s population because of delayed marriages, notwithstanding the contraceptive mindset that abounds, along with the abortions, contributing to a reduced follow up generation to continue funding the Social Security Ponzi scheme, not to mention the reduced future revenues from a diminishing generation of taxpayers.

    Our freedoms are bolstered by home, and property ownership, which give a sense of having a stake in something substantial for which to fight and preserve, in order to hand it down to our heirs for their future well-being, and so on. This is what builds a solid stable society. Not nomadic lifestyles, based on chasing the almighty dollar to fund a jet-setting lifestyle to immerse ourselves in worldly living, depending on claustrophobic housing, piling the masses one on top of the other in smaller and smaller areas of land concentration. Which, by the way is the way the Communists love to “nudge” people into accepting as the norm by propaganda, or regulating the populace into it. Better to control the masses. Agenda 21…it’s real. And, it’s happening in your neighborhood. Look it up.

    I also agree with Lisa on this article. I had to remind myself that this is a Catholic dating site, not a social media haven. It’s really not something I expected to see on this site.

    I’m just saying….. :-)

    • Josh-196444 February 7, 2013

      Interesting comment. I thought of Rush’s Subdivisions when I read this.

      However, society has changed so that women and men can have it all–family, significant others AND career.

      You could make the argument it is a media-driven phenomenon.

  8. Lucia-551179 February 15, 2013

    I lived at home until over a year ago when I got my first apartment at 41. How I live, work and date has changed drastically! The CM fellow I am with has benefitted from knowing that I can hold my own with a career, family and social life. We had some extreme issues to deal with during our first year, but now we have come to a better understanding of each other. Not everyone is going to agree with moving out after high school or college, and even I had my reasons to stay with my family as long as I did. One thing I do know: I am so glad I did move out when I did because I had to grow up in a way that couldn’t happen at a later time.

  9. Courtney-885262 March 20, 2013

    “My generation, known as Millennials, is delaying marriage and motherhood in favor of a career or adventure-driven 20s, and because of this, birth and fertility rates are dropping. The female fertility rate is at its lowest level in recorded U.S. history, according to the Centers for Disease Control/Raymond James research.”

    There’s a growing habit of making blanket statements about groups. We (Millennials, women, white men, pick a group) are not monolithic. The above statement has been bandied about a lot, and borders on groupthink. I’m 28 and have rented for years, I’ve had plenty of adventures and I enjoy my “career,” but I didn’t forsake marriage and children to pursue those things, nor have I heard of a woman say the reason she’s putting off falling in love is to have an apartment and nifty job. Love is a matter of God’s timing, and it happens to people with and without mortgage payments.

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